Teachers And Staff Development Trainers Vocational-Books Pdf

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Australian National Training Authority 2001, This work has been produced by the National Centre for. Vocational Education Research NCVER with the, assistance of funding provided by the Australian. National Training Authority ANTA It is published by. NCVER under licence from ANTA Apart from any use, permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 no part of this. publication may be reproduced by any process without. the written permission of NCVER Ltd Requests should. be made in writing to NCVER Ltd, The views and opinions expressed in this document are. those of the author project team and do not necessarily. reflect the views of the Australian National Training. ISBN 0 87397 710 6 print edition, ISBN 0 87397 711 4 web edition.
TD TNC 66 11, Published by, 252 Kensington Road Leabrook SA 5068. PO Box 115 Kensington Park SA 5068 Australia, www ncver edu au. List of tables and figures v, Acknowledgements vi, Executive summary vii. 1 Background to the study 1, Introduction, This study. Significance for key stakeholders, Structure of this report.
2 A profile of teachers and trainers in the VET sector 6. Introduction, VET teachers and trainers, Teachers trainers workplaces. Teachers trainers work, 3 Future policy challenges and VET teachers and trainers 14. Introduction, Challenges, Attributes skills knowledge and competencies needed to meet the challenges. Attributes skills knowledge and competencies that teachers trainers currently possess. Preparedness of VET teachers and trainers to meet the challenges. 4 Current arrangements for staff development 20, Introduction. Overview of current provision, How staff development is organised within registered training organisations.
5 VET teachers and trainers and their experiences of staff development 29. Introduction, Staff development undertaken by teachers trainers. Factors preventing teachers trainers from undertaking staff development. 6 Good practice in staff development for VET teachers and trainers 42. Introduction, Barriers to developing good practice. Critical success factors in staff development, Towards a good practice model. Contents iii, 7 Conclusions and recommendations 59. Introduction, Summary and implications, Recommendations.
References 69, Appendices, A Literature review 75, B Overview of current provision of staff development for VET teachers trainers 85. C Delphi study of VET key informants, D Telephone survey of human resource personnel in public and private. registered training organisations, E Questionnaire survey of teachers trainers in public and private registered. training organisations, F Case studies of staff development sites and programs. Appendices C F can be found on the World Wide Web at www ncver edu au research proj nr8018a pdf. iv The changing role of staff development for teachers and trainers in VET. List of tables and figures, 1 Employment mode and gender of teachers and trainers in providers where figures.
were given in the HR survey 7, 2 Type of organisation by mode of employment for those teachers trainers employed. in that organisation for two years or less 11, 3 Attributes from round three of the Delphi survey 17. 4 Skills from round three of the Delphi survey 17, 5 Knowledge fro m round three of the Delphi survey 18. 6 Competencies capabilities from round three of the Delphi survey 18. 7 Current preparedness of VET teacher trainers to face challenges 19. 8 Bases on which staff development needs are predominantly determined in provid ers. for each employment mode expressed in a single points score and showing the. most frequent basis in parenthesis 24, 9 Types and frequency of support currently provided by organisations for staff in. different employment modes 25, 10 Minimum level of teaching training qualification required by providers for each.
employment mode at time of appointment and after commencing employment 30. 11 Formal qualifications acquired before and after employment by type of RTO 31. 12 Formal qualifications acquired be fore and after employment by mode of employment 32. 1 Report structure Research objectives x methodologies x report sections appendices 5. 2 Years of employment of the teachers and trainers with their current organisation 8. 3 Percentages of respond ing providers offering various levels of qualifications 10. 4 Staff development structures in private and public training providers 24. 5 Human resource respondents ratings of importance of factors influencing decisions. their provider makes about staff development for teachers trainers 26. 6 Factors affecting decisions about staff development rated very important by. provider type 27, 7 Type of institution where teachers trainers are currently completing. formal qualifications 33, 8 Rankings of importance of teachers trainers reasons for completing formal. qualifications by mode of employment 34, 9 Proportions of teachers trainers who have undertaken staff development in the. designated topics and hours spent on each area 36, 10 Designated areas where tea chers trainers have undertaken structured staff. development in the past year by mode of employment 36. 11 Type of institution where teachers trainers had undertaken structured education and. training activities in the past year 37, 12 Rankings of importanc e of teachers trainers reasons for undertaking structured.
education and training activities by employment mode 38. 13 Factors preventing teachers trainers from undertaking formal qualifications by. employment mode 39, 14 Factors preventing teachers trainers from participating in structured education and. training activities by employment mode 40, 15 Case study organisations and programs by location 42. 16 Factors affecting engagement of individual VET teachers with staff development. associated with top down change 46, 17 Summary of some problems and possible solutions in staff development 57. List of tables and figures v, Acknowledgements, The research team comprised eight researchers across three States. Roger Harris team leader Michele Simons Erica Smith and David Snewin Centre for. Research in Education Equity and Work University of South Australia. Adelaide SA, Doug Hill Group for Research in Employment and Training Charles Sturt University.
Wagga Wagga NSW, John Blakeley Department of Employment Training Industrial Relations Brisbane. Queensland, Ron Pearce and Sarojni Choy Centre for the Advancement of Innovative Learning. Maryborough Queensland, The team thanks the project reference group for their encouragement and feedback. Deirdre Baker Department of Employment Training Industrial Relations Brisbane. Queensland, Berwyn Clayton Canberra Institute of Technology Canberra ACT. Ian Gribble Office of Training and Further Education Melbourne Victoria. Jennifer Newcombe Australian Education Union Melbourne Victoria. Pamela Walsh Adelaide SA, We also thank the various State Territory based researchers who helped the project s.
research team with some of the case studies Mike Brown Ros Brennan Annette Green. Janene Lobegeier Dorothy McManus Cathrena McRae Adrianne Moloney Christine Owen. John Retallick Ted Rosenblatt and Peter Waterhouse Their valuable questioning assisted. in the gathering of the rich data that underlie this project. The Marketing Science Centre within the University of South Australia is also gratefully. acknowledged for its contribution to the telephone survey of human resource officers in. registered training organisations For data entry of the teachers trainers questionnaires. recognition is given for the painstaking work of Angela Harris Sherri Bailey and. Helen Trewartha And our thanks go to Miriam McLean for her much needed assistance in. the final stages of formatting, Finally our sincerest appreciation is expressed to the considerable numbers of teachers. trainers and human resource officers within the VET sector who willingly gave their. time and energy in providing the much needed information which forms the basis of this. study Without the support of the research grant from the National Research and. Evaluation Committee this research would not have been undertaken Thank you. especially to the managers of that program first Hugh Guthrie and more recently. Jennifer Gibb for their advice enthusiasm and above all patience. vi The changing role of staff development for teachers and trainers in VET. Executive summary, This study explored the changing role of staff development for vocational education and. training VET teachers and trainers in Australian public and private registered training. organisations Substantial reforms in the VET sector over the past decade have had. considerable impact on the work of teachers and trainers In this context of rapid change. the nature direction delivery access and funding responsibility of staff development are. undergoing transformation The purpose of this research therefore was to examine current. staff development provision research a range of issues relating to the staff development of. VET teachers and trainers and make recommendations in the light of the new education. and training environment, The lack of national data on VET teachers and trainers increasing devolution of staff. development within VET systems and the complexity of the issues meant that a. combination of research approaches was required Information for the study was gathered. in six different ways, a preliminary analysis of VET staff development provision from information furnished. by State Territory authorities and universities, a literature review of mainly Australian but also some international publications on.
VET staff development, a Delphi survey involving three rounds of surveying 31 key stakeholders in VET across. telephone interviews with human resource personnel in a national stratified sample of. 394 public and private registered training organisations. a questionnaire survey of 686 teachers and trainers in those organisations. analysis of 15 case studies of staff development in a number of VET organisations and. The overall profile of VET staff is one of a very diversified workforce where shifts are. occurring in terms of such important work factors as employment patterns required. qualifications fields of study training market competition and nature of delivery. Key stakeholders in VET identified a number of particular challenges which staff in the. VET sector are likely to face during the next five to seven years The most critical were. operating in a competitive market keeping up to date with changes in VET flexible. delivery understanding and working with training packages and using technology Only. about half of the current VET staff were considered to possess the necessary attributes. skills knowledge and capabilities needed to meet these challenges These capabilities. were not seen to be uniformly distributed in the workforce with groups such as part time. older and casual staff often perceived as having less expertise Slightly less than half the. current VET teachers trainers were considered to possess the attributes skills and. knowledge required to improve the quality of VET provision These findings have. significant implications for staff development during the next few years. The study found quite different patterns in the approaches of public and private VET. providers to staff development One of the most important differences is in what is expected. of teachers trainers at the time of appointment Private providers are far more keen to. recruit already qualified staff while TAFE is more prepared to allow staff to complete. teaching training qualifications following appointment This difference explains to a. Executive summary vii, considerable extent their varying approaches to subsequent staff development Far more. TAFE institutions have specialist structures for staff development than do private. providers and they offer far more courses at all levels than do private providers. especially at diploma levels and above reflecting their longer history and larger size It is. clear that the Certificate IV in Assessment and Workplace Training has become the de. facto qualification for teaching training in VET This will increasingly be reinforced by the. common stipulation within training packages for this level of qualification and by the. finding in this study that decisions on staff development tend to be influenced more by. policy imperatives than by industrial relations agreements or career plans. The findings indicate that it is factors more external to providers and their staff that are. impacting most heavily on decisions made by providers about staff development The. changing policy context of VET strongly influences the nature and extent of staff. development particularly so in the case of public institutions The combined impact of the. changes in the VET sector is causing increased pressures on the work of teachers and trainers. This factor is reported as easily the most critical factor in preventing them from. undertaking further staff development Nevertheless the results indicate that a. substantial quantum of both formal and less formal staff development is happening. The degree to which permanent contract and casual sessional staff had access to and. participated in staff development was found to differ greatly Providers generally favour. Erica Smith Ron Pearce John Blakeley Sarojni Choy David Snewin teachers and trainers in NCVER The changing role of staff development for role vocational education and training trainers changing role vocationalThe changing role of teachers andvocational education staff development staff development training teachers training Australian National Training Authority 2001 This work has been

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