Revisions In The Current Population Survey Effective -Books Pdf

Revisions in the Current Population Survey Effective
27 Mar 2020 | 8 views | 0 downloads | 25 Pages | 2.28 MB

Share Pdf : Revisions In The Current Population Survey Effective

Download and Preview : Revisions In The Current Population Survey Effective


Report CopyRight/DMCA Form For : Revisions In The Current Population Survey Effective



Transcription

Computerization complexity of the skip patterns and the use of dependent. The new questionnaire was designed for a computer interviewing it would be nearly impossible to administer. assisted interview In most cases interviewers conduct the the new survey using a paper and pencil questionnaire In. survey either in person at the respondent s home or by tele fact there is no operational paper version of the new ques. phone from the interviewer s home using laptop comput tionnaire. ers on which the questionnaire has been programmed. This mode of data collection is known as computer,Major Questionnaire Changes. assisted personal interviewing CAP Interviewers ask. the survey questions as they appear automatically on the Enhanced accuracy. Unlike the 1967 revision whose major purpose was to. screen of the laptop and then type the responses directly. into the computer At the end of each day interviewers sharpen the definition of unemployment the emphasis of. transmit the data via modem to the computer at the the 1994 redesign was to improve the overall quality of la. Bureau of the Census headquarters A portion of sample bor market information through extensive question. changes and the introduction of computers into the collec. households expected to reach about 20 percent later this. year is interviewed via CATI from two centralized tele tion procedures The redesign was also undertaken to ob. phone centers located in Hagerstown Maryland and tain data on topics not previously or adequately covered. Tucson Arizona by interviewers who also use a comput While the labor force status of most people is straight. erized questionnaire forward some are more difficult to classify correctly espe. Computer assisted interviewing has important benefits cially if they are engaged in activities that are relatively in. most notably formal or intermittent Many of the changes to the ques. tionnaire were made to deal with such cases This was ac. Consistency In a survey such as the CPS consistency from complished by rewording and adding questions to con. interview to interview is essential for data quality Auto form more precisely with the official definitions making. mation facilitates the use of a relatively complex question the questions easier to understand and answer minimizing. naire incorporating complicated skip patterns and stan reliance on volunteered responses revising response cate. dardized followup questions Yet certain questions are gories and taking advantage of the benefits of an auto. automatically tailored to the individual s situation to mated interview Areas affected by these improvements. make them more understandable to the respondent include. Editing The computerized questionnaire has several built Reference week Many questions refer to activities last. in editing features including automatic checks for internal week but in the former questionnaire the time period was. consistency and unlikely responses In this way some po never defined Research found that fewer than 20 percent. tential errors can be caught and corrected during the inter of respondents defined the reference week as it is meant in. view itself, the survey that is from Sunday to Saturday of the week. Dependent interviewing An automated interview also per including the 12th day of the month The new question. mits dependent interviewing that is the use of informa naire provides respondents with the specific dates of the. tion in the current interview that was obtained in a pre reference week. vious month s interview Dependent interviewing reduces. On layoff Persons on layoff are defined as those who are. respondent and interviewer burden while improving con. separated from a job to which they are awaiting recall The. sistency of the data from one month to the next The tech. nique is being used to confirm the previously reported oc old questionnaire however was not structured to consis. tently obtain information on the expectation of recall This. cupation and industry of a person s job and for many peo. ple not in the labor force to confirm their status as retired was a particular problem since in common parlance the. or disabled If it is determined that there has been no term layoff has come to refer to a permanent termina. change in the information which was supplied in the earli tion rather than the temporary situation that BLS and the. Census Bureau are trying to measure, er interview no further questions on the topic are asked If. however the information which was previously supplied In order to measure layoffs more accurately questions. has changed the respondents are asked to provide the up were added to determine if people reported to be on layoff. did in fact have an expectation of recall that is had they. dated information In a somewhat different form of depen. dent interviewing persons duration of unemployment is been given a specific date to return to work or at least had. asked in the first month they are reported as unemployed they been given an indication that they would be recalled. and this information is automatically updated by either 4 within the next 6 months Also a direct question about. or 5 weeks if they remain unemployed in the subsequent layoff replaced a long and cumbersome question about. month both layoff and absence from work, It should be noted that the new questionnaire was de Jobsearch methods To be counted as unemployed a per. signed for computer assisted interviewing Given the son must have engaged in an active job search during the 4. weeks prior to the survey that is must have taken some Unpaid family workers The definition of employment in. action that could result in a job offer In addition to con cludes persons who work without pay for at least 15 hours. tacting employers directly active jobsearch methods a week in a business or farm owned by a member of their. include answering want ads sending out resumes and immediate family To better measure the extent of work in. contacting private or public employment agencies On the such businesses the new questionnaire has a direct ques. other hand passive methods such as taking a class or tion on the presence of a business in the household Per. sik ply reading the want ads do not qualify as a jobsearch sons in households with a business who are not otherwise. To allow interviewers to better distinguish between active employed are specifically asked if they worked in the. and passive methods the response categories for jobsearch business. methods were expanded and reformatted Also the basic. Earnings With the former questionnaire respondents. question on jobsearch methods was reworded and, were asked to report their earnings as a weekly amount.
followup questions were added to encourage respondents. even though that may not have been the easiest way to re. to report all types of jobsearch activity, call or report their earnings In the new version respon. dents are asked to report earnings in the time frame which. Hours at work Research showed that when asked about they find easiest for example hourly weekly biweekly. their actual hours at work some respondents provided monthly or annual Weekly earnings are automatically. their scheduled or usual hours instead To improve the calculated for persons who respond on a basis other than. accuracy of these data the series of questions on hours weekly Also individuals are asked a specific question to. worked was reordered to incorporate a recall strategy determine if they usually receive overtime pay tips or. which asks for usual hours first then about possible time commissions For minimum wage studies all earners are. taken off or extra hours worked during the reference week asked if they are in fact paid at hourly rates. and finally about hours actually worked, The questionnaire redesign also makes it possible to. Reasons for working part time Persons who work part collect several types of data regularly for the first time. time fewer than 35 hours a week do so either voluntarily namely. that is because of personal constraints or preferences or. involuntarily that is because of business related reasons Multipe jobholding Employed persons are now asked. such as slack work or the lack offull time opportunities each month whether they had more than one job This al. Because respondents typically are not familiar with this lows BLS to produce estimates of multiple jobholding on a. distinction the question asking why those working part monthly basis rather than having to derive them through. time were doing so was reworded to provide examples of special periodic supplements The inclusion of the multi. the two types of reasons More importantly the measure ple jobholding question also enhances the accuracy of an. ment of working part time involuntarily or for economic swers to the questions on hours worked and it may help to. reasons was modified to better reflect the concept Start reconcile employment estimates from the CPS with those. ing in 1994 workers who are part time for economic rea from the Current Employment Statistics program BLS. sons must want and be available for full time work Indi survey of nonfarm business establishments. viduals who usually work part time for an economic rea. son are asked direct questions to determine if they meet Usual hours All employed persons are asked each month. these criteria those usually working full time are assumed about the hours they usually work Previously informa. to meet them tion on usual hours was collected from just one quarter of. wage and salary workers each month, Occupation and industry Research has shown that the for. Definitional changes, mer system of asking questions on occupation industry. As part of the redesign several labor force defmitions. and class of worker independently each month led to an. were modified specifically, overreporting of month to month change The accuracy.
of these data will benefit significantly from the use of de Discouraged workers This was the most importantdefini. pendent interviewing with most respondents being asked tional change implemented The Levitan Commission had. to supply this information only in the initial interview In criticized the former definition because it was based on a. subsequent months they are asked merely to verify the in SUbjective desire for work and on somewhat arbitrary as. formation that had been reported earlier regarding their sumptions about an individual s availability to take a job. employer occupation and usual activities on the job If no As a result of the redesign two requirements were added. changes have taken place no further questions are asked For persons to qualify as discouraged they must have en. and the information is simply carried forward If changes gaged in some job search within the past year or since they. in the job situation have occurred the series of questions last worked if they worked within the past year and they. that was asked in the previous month is asked again must be currently available to take a job Formerly avail. ability was inferred from responses to other questions basis and classified as full time workers In the revised. now there is a direct question Discouraged workers are questionnaire all workers are asked the number of hours. now defined as persons who want a job are available to take they usually work and are classified accordingly. a job and who had looked for work within the past year but. The Darallel Survey, not within the prior 4 weeks because they believed their. search would be futile Specifically their main reason for As mentioned above the new computerized question. not recently looking for work was one of the following Be naire was tested in a parallel survey also known as the. lieves no work available in line of work or area couldn t find CATI CAPI Overlap The parallel survey was ad minis. any work lacks necessary schooling training skills or expe tered to approximately 12 000 households per month for. rience employers think too young or too old or other types 18 months from July 1992 to December 1993 The survey. of discrimination Also beginning in January 1994 ques had several objectives including testing the complex pro. tions on this subject are asked of the full CPS sample rather gramming of the questionnaire breaking in computerized. than being limited to a quarter of the sample permitting data collection and transmission operations and measur. estimates of the num ber of discouraged workers to be pub ing differences in major labor force estimates between the. lished monthly rather than quarterly old and new surveys Since a lack of funding prevented the. administration of the former questionnaire in a CAP en. Unemployment A relatively minor change was incorpo vironment and since the new questionnaire s complexity. rated into the definition of unemployment Under the for prevented its administration on paper the effects of com. mer definition persons who volunteered that they were puter assisted data collection on the labor force estimates. waiting to start a job within 30 days a very small group cannot be completely isolated from the effects of changes. numerically were classified as unemployed whether or in question wording and sequence. not they were actively looking for work Under the new The parallel survey was a nationally representative sur. definition people waiting to start a new job are no longer vey in which all of the largest metropolitan areas were in. automatically counted as unemployed Rather they must cluded and the remaining areas were sampled on a proba. have actively looked for a job within the last 4 weeks in bility basis The parallel survey had the same rotation. order to be counted as unemployed Otherwise they will schedule as the CPS that is households were interviewed. be classified as not in the labor force Thus beginning in for 4 months left the mple for the next 8 months and. January 1994 the unemployed are defined as persons 1 then were interviewed for another 4 months. without jobs 2 actively seeking work or on layoff from a When comparing estimates derived from the parallel. job and expecting recall who need not be seeking work to survey with official CPS estimates it should be recognized. qualify and 3 currently available to take a job including that the parallel survey was based on a national sample in. temporary illness contrast with the State based sample design of the CPS. Moreover the sample of the parallel survey was just one. fifth the size of the CPS sample This means that its esti. New entrants and reentrants Unemployed persons who. mates have greater variance particularly those for small. were not working just before their jobsearch commenced. groups which are based on relatively few sample mem. are classified as either new entrants or reentrants to the. labor force Prior to 1994 new entrants were defined as. The data compared in this article are 1993 annual aver. job seekers who had never worked at a full time job lasting. ages There were of course month to month fluctuations. 2 weeks or longer reentrants were defined as jobseekers. especially in the parallel survey which are mini, who had held a full time job for at least 2 weeks and had. mized using averages of 12 months of data For example. then spent some time out of the labor force prior to their. the overall unemployment rate from the parallel survey for. most recent period of jobsearch These definitions have. the 12 month period under study January December, been modified to encompass any type of job not just a full. 1993 averaged 0 5 percentage point higher than the rate. time job of at least 2 weeks duration Thus new entrants. from the CPS compared with monthly differences ranging. are now defined as jobseekers who have never worked at. from 0 1 to 0 7 percentage point, all and reentrants are jobseekers who have worked before. but not immediately prior to their jobsearch,Comparisons Between CPS and Parallel.
Survey Estimates, Full time and part time workers The classification of full The following analysis describes differences in labor. and part time workers is now based completely on their market estimates between the official CPS and the parallel. usual weekly hours worked In the past due to limitations survey for 1993 This includes highlights of the major. in the questionnaire persons who worked full time in the. 1 The sample design of the parallel survey was based on that used by the. reference week were not asked about their usual hours National Crime Victimization Survey NCVS which is conducted by the. Rather they were assumed to work full time on a usual Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Justice Statistics. differences as well as sections on the employed unem 69 9 percent See table 2. ployed persons in the labor force and persons not in the There are several questionnaire changes which may. labor force have contributed to higher estimates of employment. Explanations for observed differences in the estimates among women Many of the revisions to the new question. are suggested whenever possible It is important to note naire were made to capture labor force activity more com. however that given the sweeping changes to the survey it pletely especially that of a more irregular or informal na. is impossible to completely disentangle the underlying ture To this end key questions on work activity were re. causes behind the differences In general only differences worded See exhibit A For example the question asking. that are statistically significant at the 90 percent confi about work was changed from Did you do any work at all. dence level are discussed Confidence intervals for major LAST WEEK not counting work around the house to. estimates are shown in table 1 Standard errors for esti LAST WEEK did you do ANY work for pay Some. mates in all other tables are available from BLS upon re respondents to the former questionnaire may have failed. quest In order to maintain comparability with parallel to report work activities if their activities were part time. survey results the CPS estimates used in this article were intermittent or perhaps even if they were home based. not subjected to the compositing procedure and as a result The revised question communicates more clearly to the re. may not always agree with published estimates spondent that the survey uses an inclusive definition of. work to encompass any work for pay, Highlights of findings Indeed the entire context of the interview must be con. The following are highlights of the study comparing sidered The labor force portion of the former CPS inter. data from the parallel survey using the revised question view began with the following question What were you. naire and automated collection with the CPS using the doing most of LAST WEEK Working keeping house go. former questionnaire and procedures for 1993 ing to school or something else This question original. The national unem ployment rate as estimated by the ly introduced as an icebreaker has been criticized on. parallel survey was higher than the rate obtained by the several grounds For one we really don t want to know. CPS This difference averaged 0 5 percentage point table what a person was doing most of last week the answer to. 1 As shown in table 2 the measured effect was relatively that might be something unrelated to labor force activity. larger for women than for men The parallel survey also but rather whether a person worked at all last week The. measured more unemployment among teenagers and old phrase most of last week moreover may have beenindi. er workers 65 years and over eating to some respondents that the interest of the survey. The overall proportion of the population that was was in full time regular employment and not in part. working the employment population ratio was essen time or intermittent work. tially the same in the parallel survey and the CPS Howev Another difficulty with the former opening question was. er there were marked differences by gender For men the that interviewers were instructed to tailor it depending on. ratio was lower in the parallel survey than in the CPSj for the person s apparent situation For a person typically a. women the ratio based on the parallel survey was higher woman who appeared to be a homemaker the question. The labor force participation rate was estimated to could be phrased What were you doing most of last. be higher in the parallel survey than in the CPS Again week working keeping house or something else For a. there were significant differences by gender The percent young person the question could be tailored to read What. age for men was lower in the parallel survey while the rate were you doing most of last week working going to. for women was higher school or something else The working option was not. always offered Everyone else was asked What were you. Employment doing most of last week working or something else It is. As stated above overall estimates of employment dif not known to what extent these procedures were. fered little between the parallel survey and the CPS The followed however the instructions for tailoring pro. employment population ratio was 61 8 percent in the par vided the potential for bias and may have cast doubt. allel survey statistically indistinguishable from the 61 7 on the intent of the survey to capture all labor force. percent using the CPS This similarity in the aggregate ra activity. tio however masks significant differences by gender The In the new questionnaire none of the questions is cus. ratio for women was higher in the parallel survey than in tomized on the basis of the appearance of respondents. the CPS 54 9 versus 54 2 percent while for men the Thus for example after an opening question asked once. measure from the parallel survey was lower 69 3 versus for the entire household on the presence of a business or. farm everyone is asked whether he or she did any work for. 5 Compositing is an estimation procedure which reduces variability in. pay clearly setting the tone that this is a survey in which. estimates especially of month to month change For a detailed explana. tion see Estimating Methods under the Household Data section of the labor force activity is the sole interest Also the new ver. Explanatory Notes and Estimates of Error in this publication sion systematically asks about employment in family busi. Table 1 Employment status of the population for selected labor force groups using 1980 census based population estimates. from the CPS and the parallel survey 1993 annual averages. Numbers in thousands,Difference,Employment status and group CPS1 survey. Level Error at 1 6 sigma2, Civilian noninstitutional population o 193 550 193 550 0 0. Civilian labor force 128 103 128 965 862 642,Percent of population 66 2 66 6 4 3.
Employed 119 389 119 606 217 696,Employment population ratio 61 7 61 8 1 4. Unemployed 0 8 714 9 359 645 278,Unemployment rate 6 8 7 3 5 2. Men 20 years and over, Civilian noninstitutional population 85 906 85 850 56 0. Civilian labor force 66 077 65 599 478 354,Percent of population 76 9 76 4 5 4. Employed 61 884 61 283 601 381,Employment population ratio 72 0 71 4 6 4.
Unemployed 4 193 4 316 123 189,Unemployment rate 6 4 6 6 2 3. Women 20 years and over, Civilian noninstitutional population 94 389 94 361 28 0. Civilian labor force 55 184 56 162 978 486,Percent of population 58 5 59 5 1 0 5. Employed 51 966 52 604 638 503,Employment population ratio 55 1 55 8 7 5. Unemployed 3 219 3 559 340 159,Unemployment rate 5 8 6 3 5 3.
Both sexes 16 to 19 years, Civilian noninstitutional populanon 13 254 13 338 84 0. Civilian labor force 6 842 7 203 361 178,Percent of population 51 6 54 0 2 4 1 3. Employed 5 540 5 719 179 174,Employment population ratio 41 8 42 9 1 1 1 3. Unemployed 1 503 1 485 182 100,Unemployment rate 19 0 20 6 1 6 1 3. Civilian noninstitutional population 163 921 163 921 0 0. Civilian labor force 109 407 110 209 802 607,Percent of population 66 7 67 2 5 4.
Employed 102 891 103 267 376 648,Employment population ratio 62 8 63 0 2 4. Unemployed 6 516 6 942 426 223,Unemployment rate 6 0 6 3 3 2. Civilian noninstitutional population 22 329 22 329 0. Civilian labor force 13 957 13 908 49 325,Percent of population 62 5 62 3 2 1 5. 12 148 11 923 225 321,Employment population ratio 54 4 53 4 1 0 1 4. Unemployed 1 809 1 985 176 129,Unemployment rate 13 0 14 3 1 3 9.
See footnote at end of table, Table 1 Employment status of the population for selected labor force groups using 1980 census based population estimates. from the CPS and the parallel survey 1993 annual averages Continued. Numbers in thousands,Difference,Employment status and group Parallel. Level Error at 1 6 sigma2,Hispanic origin, Civilian noninstitutional population 15 753 15 753 O 0. Civilian labor force 10 385 10 666 281 241,Percent of population 65 9 67 7 1 8 1 5. Employed 0 9 285 9 412 127 268,Employment population ratio 58 9 59 7 8 1 7.
Unemployed 1 100 1 254 154 97,Unemployment rate 10 6 11 8 1 2 9. 1 These estimates differ slightly from previously published 1993 always agree due to slight differences in estimating procedures Detail. averages because of the estimation procedure used for the above race and Hispanic origin groups will not sum to totals be. 2 Sampling error at the 90 percent confidence level cause data for the other races group are not presented and Hispanics. NOTE Population estimates obtained from the two surveys will not are included in both the white and black population groups. Table 2 Employment status of the population by age sex race and Hispanic origin using 1980 census based estimates from the. CPS and the parallel survey 1993 annual averages,Numbers in thousands. Total Men Women,Employment status and age,Parallel Differ Parallel Differ Parallel Differ. CPS1 CPS1 CPS1,survey ence2 survey ence2 survey ence2. Civilian noninstitutional,population, Total 16 years and over 193 550 193 550 0 92 620 92 620 0 00 930 100 930 0.
16 to 19 years 13 254 13 338 84 6 714 6 769 55 6 540 6 569 29. 20 to 24 years 17 583 17 641 58 8 613 8 677 64 8 970 8 964 6. 25 to 34 years 41 314 41 375 61 20 382 20 374 8 20 933 21 002 69. 35 to 44 years 40 341 40 238 103 19 831 19 785 46 20 510 20 453 57. 45 to 54 years 28 863 28 943 80 14 027 14 016 11 14 836 14 927 91. 55 to 64 years 21 029 21 006 23 9 976 9 990 14 11 053 11 016 37. 65 years and over 31 164 31 008 156 13 078 13 009 69 18 086 17 999 87. Civilian labor force, Total 16 years and over 128 103 128 965 862 69 656 69 300 356 58 447 59 664 1 217. 16 to 19 years 6 842 7 203 361 3 579 3 702 123 3 263 3 502 239. 20 to 24 years 13 555 13 705 150 7 159 7 186 27 6 396 6 519 123. 25 to 34 years 34 473 34 609 136 19 049 18 828 221 15 424 15 782 358. 35 to 44 years 34 274 34 287 13 18 544 18 457 87 15 730 15 830 100. 45 to 54 years 23 556 23 622 66 12 642 12 482 160 10 914 11 139 225. 55 to 64 years 11 863 11 736 127 6 632 6 473 159 5 231 5 262 31. 65 years and over 0 3 540 3 802 262 2 051 2 173 122 1 489 1 629 140. Participation rate, Total 16 years and over 0 66 2 66 6 4 75 2 74 8 4 57 9 59 1 1 2. 16 to 19 years 51 6 54 0 2 4 53 3 54 7 1 4 49 9 53 3 3 4. 20 to 24 years 77 1 77 7 6 83 1 82 8 3 71 3 72 7 1 4. 25 to 34 years 83 4 83 6 2 93 5 92 4 1 1 73 7 75 1 1 4. 35 to 44 years 85 0 85 2 2 93 5 93 3 2 76 7 77 4 7. 45 to 54 years 81 6 81 6 0 90 1 89 1 1 0 73 6 74 6 1 0. 55 to 64 years 56 4 55 9 5 66 5 64 8 1 7 47 3 47 8 5. 65 years and over 11 4 12 3 9 15 7 16 7 1 0 8 2 9 1 9. See footnote at end of table, Table 2 Employment stJtusof th opulatlon by age sex race and Hispanic origin using 1980 census based estimates from the. CPS and the parallel survey 1993 annual averages Continued. Numbers in thousands,Total Men Women, Employment status and age Parallel Parallel Differ. Differ Parallel Differ,CPS1 survey CPS1 CPS1,ence2 survey ence2 survey ence2.
Total 16 years and over 119 389 119 606 217 64 727 64 200 527 54 662 55 406 744. 16 to 19 years 5 540 5 719 179 2 844 2 918 74 2 696 2 802 106. 20 to 24 years 12 137 12 233 96 6 354 6 386 32 5 783 5 846 63. 25 to 34 years 32 119 32 099 20 17 729 17 527 202 14 390 14 573 183. 35 to 44 years 32 406 32 347 59 17 512 17 400 112 14 894 14 947 53. 45 to 54 years 22 444 22 431 13 12 011 11 808 203 10 433 10 623 190. 55 to 64 years 11 313 11 154 159 6 292 6 106 186 5 022 5 048 26. 65 years and over 3 430 3 623 193 1 986 2 057 71 1 444 1 566 122. Employment population, Total 16 years and over 61 7 61 8 1 69 9 69 3 6 54 2. 16 to 19 years 41 8 42 9 1 1 42 4 43 1 7 41 2 42 7 1 5. 20 to 24 years 69 0 69 3 3 73 8 73 6 2 64 5 65 2 7. 25 to 34 years 77 7 77 6 1 87 0 86 0 1 0 68 7, 35 to 44 years 80 3 80 4 1 88 3 88 0 3 72 6 73 1 5. 45 to 54 years 77 8 77 5 3 85 6 84 3 1 3 70 3 i 71 2 9. 55 to 64 years 53 8 53 1 7 63 1 61 1 2 0 45 4 45 8 4. 65 years and over 11 0 11 7 7 15 2 15 8 6 8 0 8 7 7. Unemployed, Total 16 years and over 8 714 9 359 645 4 928 5 100 172 3 785 I 4 259 474. 16 to 19 years 1 302 1 485 183 735 784 49 567 700 133. 20 to 24 years 1 417 1 472 55 805 800 5 613 673 60. 25 to 34 years 2 354 2 511 157 1 320 1 301 19 1 034 1 210 176. 35 to 44 years 1 868 1 940 72 1 033 1 057 24 835 883 48. 45 to 54 years 1 112 1 190 78 631 675 44 482 516 34. 55 to 64 years 550 581 31 341 367 26 209 214 5,65 years and over 110 180 70 65 116 51 45 63 18. Unemployment rate, Total 16 years and over 6 8 7 3 5 7 1 7 4 3 6 5 7 1 6.
16 to 19 years 19 0 20 6 1 6 20 5 21 2 7 17 4 20 0 2 6. 20 to 24 years 10 5 10 7 2 11 2 11 1 1 9 6 10 3 7,25 to 34 years 6 8 7 3 5 6 9 6 9 0 6 7 7 7 1 0. 35 to 44 years 5 5 5 7 2 5 6 5 7 1 5 3 5 6 3,45 to 54 years 4 7 5 0 3 5 0 5 4 4 4 4 4 6 2. 55 to 64 years 4 6 5 0 4 5 1 5 7 6 4 0 4 1 1, 65 years and ever 3 1 4 7 1 6 3 2 5 4 2 2 3 0 3 9 9. 1 These estimates differ slightly from previously published 1993 NOTE Population estimates obtained from the two surveys will. averages because of the estimation procedure used not always agree due to slight differences in estimating procedures. 2 These differences may not equal the results obtained from comparing. the values shown in the table because of independent rounding. EXHIBIT A COMPARISON OF KEY,EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT. CPS PARALLEL SURVEY, 1 What were you doing most of LAST WEEK 1 Does anyone in this household have a business.
working or something else 2 LAST WEEK did you do ANY work for either. pay or profit, Parentheticals in question filled in if anyone in the. keeping house or something else household has a business or farm. f 1 is yes and 2 is no ask 3,going to school or something else. 3 LAST WEEK did you do any unpaid work in the,family business or farm. If answer indicates with a job but not at work, either temporarily or on layoff ask 2 and if 2 is If 2 and 3 are both no ask 4. no ask 4 1f answer indicates working skip 2, All others ask 2 4 LAST WEEK in addition to the business did you.
have a job either full or part time Include any,job from which you were temporarily absent. 2 Did you do any work at all LAST WEEK not, counting work around the house Note If farm Parenthetical in question filled in if anyone in the. or business operator in household ask about household has a business or farm. unpaid work,If 4 is no ask 5, 3 Did you have a job or business from which you 5 LAST WEEK were you on layoff from a job. weretemporarily absent or on layoff LAST,WEEK If 5 is yes ask 6 115 is no ask 8. 6 Has your employer given you a date to return to,If no ask 5 If yes ask 4 work.
If no ask 7,4 Why were you absent from work LAST WEEK. 7 Have you been given any indication that you will. be recalled to work within the next 6 months, 5 Have you been looking for work during the past 4. If no ask 8, 8 Have you been doing anything to find work during. the last 4 weeks,If yes ask 6,If yes ask 9, 6 What have you been doing in the last 4 weeks to 9 What are all of the things you have done to find. find work work during the last 4 weeks, nesses and farms where much of the previously missing Such responses disqualify persons from being classified as.
employment seems to have taken place employed and move them into the layoff jobseeking ques. The series of questions on work in the former question tion series. naire may have also led to an overstatement of men s labor A third part of the explanation is the direct question on. market activity which was concentrated among men who layoff Research has indicated that the former question on. were reported as having a job but absent from work This layoff was frequently misunderstood The new direct ques. is discussed in the section on characteristics of the tion on layoff and a revised question on the reasons for. employed absence produce a larger proportion of persons reported. but not classified as on layoff in the parallel survey than. in the CPS When the criterion of expectation of recall is. Unemployment, The new questionnaire including the new collection applied nearly 60 percent of those initially reported to be. procedures yielded an overall unemployment rate half a on layoff are eliminated from this category They are then. percentage point higher than the CPS 7 3 percent com routed to the series of questions on jobseeking and if they. pared with 6 8 percent for the period January to December have an active jobsearch which about half do and are. 1993 But as with the employment population ratio this available to work they will be counted among the unem. statistic hides variations among worker groups Namely ployed. the higher incidence of unemployment was statistically It appears that with the revised questions a number of. significant only for women workers 65 years and O i women are initially reported to be on layoff although they. and teenagers The difference for men 0 3 percentage had no expectation of recall They do however meet the. point higher in the parallel survey was close to being sta requirement of active jobsearch and thus were counted as. tistically significant unemployed It is unknown how such persons would have. The new questionnaire had a relatively large effect on responded to the previous questionnaire The new ques. women s unemploymentrate which was 7 1 percent in the tions however communicate a different message at the. parallel survey compared with 6 5 percent based on the starloftheinterview which maybe prompting more wom. CPS Unemployment in the parallel survey increased for en to report a layoff status and an active jobsearch result. both white women and black women Among age groups ing in a higher unemployment rate. teenagers and workers 65 years and over had higher jobless. rates in the parallel survey The difference for the Characteristics of the employed. 25 to 34 year old category was also statistically signifi. cant Multiple jobholding About 6 2 percent of all employed. There are several differences between the old paper people held two or more jobs during the fourth quarter of. questionnaire and the revised automated questionnaire 1993 according to findings from the parallel survey. which could help to explain the higher unemployment As a result of the redesign information on multiple job. rates obtained by the parallel survey Part of the explana holding is available each month previously this informa. tion is consistent with that given in the section on the tion had been obtained only in periodic supplements to the. employed That is the new questionnaire has a broader CPS While truly comparable data are not available from. approach to both work and jobsearch activities due at the regular CPS the most recent supplement conducted. least in part to different messages communicated at the in May 1991 also showed a multiple jobholding rate of 6 2. beginning of the survey This could help to explain the percent. higher unem ployment rates among women teenagers and. older workers who are more likely to be looking for Hours of work Hours actually worked were somewhat. informal employment lower as estimated in the parallel survey compared with. Also older people in the new questionnaire who initially the CPS Mean average hours for workers in nonagricul. report that they are retired are asked Do you want a job tural industries were 38 9 per week with the new question. either full or part time If they answer yes they are asked naire compared with 39 4 using the former questionnaire. the questions on jobsearch for potential classification as The pattern held for both adult men and adult women. unemployed The part time reference may prompt some See table 3. older workers to recall that they have looked for such a job These findings reflect several changes to the question. Another part of the explanation for the differences re naire which were made to obtain more accurate informa. lates to persons initially reported to be temporarily absent tion on hours worked per week A recall strategy was. from jobs It appears that a larger proportion of persons embedded in the series of questions asking first about. are reported as temporarily absent with the new question. naire but are not classified as such because when asked to. 6 Due to processing problems data on multiple jobholding are not. provide a reason for their absence they report they were available for the first 9 months of 1993 The data presented here are. on layoff or they cite slack work business conditions October December 1993 averages. Table 3 Persons at work In nonagrlcultural lndustrles by actual hours of work sex and age using 1980 census based population. estimates from the CPS and the parallel survey 1993 annual averages. Thousands of persons Percent distribution,Hours of work. sex and age Parallel Differ Parallel Differ,CPS1 ence2 CPS1. survey survey ence2,Total at work 110 488 111 225 737 100 0 100 0. 1 to 34 hours 26 954 29 563 2 609 24 4 26 6 2 2,1 to 14 hours 5 130 6 066 936 4 6 5 5 8.
15 to 29 hours 13 410 14 475 1 065 12 1 13 0 9,30 to 34 hours 8 414 9 021 608 7 6 8 1 5. 35 hours and over 83 535 81 663 1 872 75 6 73 4 2 2. 35 to 39 hours,7 176 8 534 1 357 6 5 7 7 1 2,40 hours 42 523 38 717 3 806 38 5 34 8 3 7. 41 to 48 hours 11 528 13 684 2 157 10 4 12 3 1 9,49 to 59 hours 13 004 12 158 845 11 8 10 9 8. 60 hours and over 9 304 8 570 735 8 4 7 7 7,Average hours total at work 39 4 38 9 6. Men 20 years and over,Total at work 57 032 57 014 18 100 0 100 0.
1 to 34 hours 8 531 9 422 891 15 0 16 5 1 6,1 to 14 hours 1 396 1 564 168 2 4 2 7 3. 15 to 29 hours 3 946 4 251 305 6 9 7 5 5,30 to 34 hours 3 190 3 607 418 5 6 6 3 7. 35 hours and over 48 501 47 592 909 85 0 83 5 1 6,35 to 39 hours 2 488 3 104 616 4 4 5 4 1 1. 40 hours 22 777 21 033 1 743 39 9 36 9 3 0,41 to 48 hours 6 980 8 387 1 408 12 2 14 7 2 5. 49 to 59 hours 9 161 8 513 648 16 1 14 9 1 1,60 hours and over 7 096 6 554 542 12 4 11 5 9.
Average hours total at work 43 1 42 7 4,Women 20 years and over. Total at work 48 308 48 956 648 100 0 e 100 0,1 to 34 hours 14 68J 16 311 1 630 30 4 33 3 2 9. 1 to 14 hours 2 537 3 259 722 5 3 6 7 1 4,15 to 29 hours 7 416 8 106 690 15 4 16 6 1 2. 30 to 34 hours 4 728 4 945 217 9 8 10 1 3,35 hours and over 33 627 32 645 983 69 6 66 7 2 9. 35 to 39 hours 4 390 5 119 729 9 1 10 5 1 4,40 hours 18 977 16 959 2 017 39 3 34 6 4 6.
41 to 48 hours 4 383 5 080 697 9 1 10 4 1 3,49 to 59 hours 3 731 3 540 191 7 7 7 2 5. 60 hours and over 2 146 1 947 200 4A 4 0 5,Average hours total at work 36 8 36 0 8. Both sexes 16 to 19 years,Total at work 5 148 5 256 108 100 0 100 0. 1 to 34 hours 3 741 3 829 88 72 7 72 9 2,1 to 14 hours 1 197 1 243 46 23 3 23 7 4. 15 to 29 hours 2 048 2 117 69 39 8 40 3 5,30 to 34 hours 496 469 27 9 6 8 9 7.
35 hours and over 1 407 1 426 20 27 3 27 1 2,35 to 39 hours 298 311 12 5 8 5 9 1. 40 hours 770 725 45 15 0 13 8 1 2,41 to 48 hours 165 217 52 3 2 4 1 9. 49 to 59 hours 112 105 6 2 2 2 0 2,60 hours and over 62 69 7 1 2 1 3 1. Average hours total at work 24 3 24 3 0, 1 These estimates differ slightly from previously published 1993 aver 2 These differences may not equal the results obtained from compar. ages because of the estimation procedure used ing the values shown in the table because of independent rounding. usual hours then about any time taken off and extra hours if they were available to accept a full time job during the. worked in the reference week and finally about total hours reference week For persons who usually work full time. actually worked And as described earlier the questions these criteria are assumed to be met The first criterion. related to employment were reworded to capture work desire for full time work had a particularly large im pact. activities more fully especially informal intermittent and in reducing the estimate of economic part time workers. part time work The more complete measurement of this while the second availability disqualified relatively few. type of work could help to lower the average number of people To provide a context for respondents the question. hours worked asking why those who want to work full time were working. The parallel survey found a higher proportion of work part time was reworded to provide examples of both eco. ers at the lower end of the hours spectrum For example nomic and noneconomic reasons for working part time. nonagricultural workers who actually worked less than 15 The difference in the proportion of full time workers as. hours in the reference week accounted for 5 5 percent of defined by their usual status who were part time for eco. persons at work in the parallel survey compared with 4 6 nomic reasons in the reference week can be at least partial. percent in the CPS Those working between 15 and 29 ly traced to several changes in the questionnaire For ex. hours in the reference week comprised 13 0 percent of per ample the parallel survey contains separate questions for. sons at work in the parallel survey compared with 12 1 people who usually and actually worked part time. percent in the CPS reducing the incidence of coding errors Also to obtain. The proportion of workers reporting a workweek of ex more accurate coding the labels of some of the noneco. actly 40 hours was lower in the parallel survey than in the nomic response categories were expanded For example. CPS With the memory aids embedded into the new ques own illness was changed to own illness injury medical. tions workers are better able to recall exceptions to their appointment and on vacation was changed to vaca. usual schedule resulting in less clustering at precisely 40 tion personal day. Part time for noneconomic reasons The proportion of. Part time employment Some of the most closely watched employed persons who worked part time for noneconomic. measures derived from the CPS pertain to part time em reasons was markedly higher in the parallel survey 21 4. ployment The proportion of employed people who usual percent compared with the CPS 18 0 percent All major. ly work part time less than 35 hours per week was larger demographic groups showed a similar pattern. in the parallel survey 17 0 percent than in the CPS 16 3 These workers can be divided into two types either. percent The difference in part time employment was rel they usually work full time or usually work part time It is. atively largest for adult women See table 4 not uncommon for workers who are usually full time to. have worked part time in the reference week having taken. Part time for economic reasons The proportion of time off for reasons such as vacation holiday or illness. em ployed persons working part time for economic reasons The higher proportion of these workers in the parallel sur. was substantially lower in the parallel survey The differ vey 7 3 percent of all employed people compared with. ences were observed for all major demographic groups but 5 3 percent in the CPS reflects the more precise informa. were relatively larger for teenagers Overall the parallel tion regarding hours at work obtained from the recall. survey found that 4 2 percent of employed persons were strategy embedded in the new questions It appears that. working part time for economic reasons compared with the new questionnaire is indeed effective in prompting. an estimate of 5 3 percent from the CPS In terms of num workers to remember exceptions to their usual schedule. bers of people this translates into 5 0 million people as Most of the people who were part time for noneconomic. measured by the parallel survey compared with 6 3 mil reasons in the reference week usually work part time often. lion as measured by the CPS a difference of 21 percent to give them more time for school family or other activi. The smaller number and proportion of workers classi ties The parallel survey also obtained a higher estimate of. fied as part time for economic reasons in the parallel sur these workers 14 1 versus 12 7 percent This differential. vey were observed among both those who usually work reflects in part the new questionnaire s more stringent re. part time and those who usually work full time Among quirements to be classified as economic part time. those who usually work part time the difference was more. pronounced for adult women and teenagers The decline Temporary absences While most employed people are. among those who usually work full time did not differ sig actually at work in the reference week some are found to. nificantly by demographic group be temporarily absentfrom their jobs for the full week The. The relatively large drop in the proportion of workers proportion of employed persons classified as temporarily. who usually work part time for economic reasons stems absent in the parallel survey 4 5 percent was lower than. from two new criteria formerly inferred that are now ex the proportion found in the CPS 5 0 percent This. plicit in the new questionnaire Persons usually working pattern held true for all major demographic groups except. part time are asked if they want to work full time and also teenagers. Table 4 Employed persons b y usual, full or part time status sex and age using 1980 census based population estimates from the.
CPS and the parallel survey 1993 annual averages,Thousands of persons Percent distribution. Sex age and full, or part ti me status CPSl Parallel Differ CPSl Parallel Differ. survey ence2 survey ence2,Total employed 119 389 119 606 217 100 0 100 0. At work 113 438 114 201 763 95 0 95 5 5, 35 hours or more 85 617 83 610 2 007 71 7 69 9 1 8. 1 to 34 hours 27 821 30 591 2 770 23 3 25 6 2 3, Part time for economic reasons 6 325 5 028 1 297 5 3 4 2 1 1.
Usually work full time 1 988 1 501 487 1 7 1 3 4,Usually work part time 4 337 3 527 810 3 6 2 9 7. Part time for noneconomic reasons 21 496 25 563 4 067 18 0 21 4 3 4. Usually work full time 6 325 8 674 2 349 5 3 7 3 2 0. Usually work part time 15 171 16 889 1 718 12 7 14 1 1 4. With a job but not at work 5 951 5 405 546 5 0 4 5 5. Men 20 years and over,Total employed 61 884 61 284 600 100 0 100 0. At work 59 198 59 065 133 95 7 96 3 6,35 hours or more 50 162 49 168 994 81 1 80 2 8. 1 to 34 hours 9 036 9 897 861 14 6 16 1 1 5, Part time for economic reasons 2 720 2 225 495 4 4 3 6 8. Usually work full time 1 140 849 291 1 8 1 4 5,Usually work part time 1 580 1 376 204 2 6 2 2 3.
Part time for noneconomic reasons 6 316 7 672 1 356 10 2 12 5 2 3. Usually work full time 3 006 4 187 1 181 4 9 6 8 2 0. Usually work part time 3 310 3 485 175 5 3 5 7 3, With a job but not at work 2 686 2 218 468 4 3 3 6 7. Women 20 years and over,Total employed 51 966 52 603 637 100 0 100 0. At work 48 885 49 643 758 94 1 94 4 3, 35 hours or more 0 33 967 32 957 1 010 65 4 62 7 2 7. 1 to 34 hours 14 918 16 686 1 768 28 7 31 7 3 0, Part time for economic reasons 2 983 2 371 612 5 7 4 5 1 2. Usually work full time 744 574 170 1 4 1 1 3,Usually work part time 2 239 1 797 442 4 3 3 4 9.
Part time for noneconomic reasons 11 935 14 315 2 380 23 0 27 2 4 2. Usually work full time 3 169 4 292 1 123 6 1 8 2 2 1. Usually work part time 8 766 10 023 1 257 16 9 19 1 2 2. With a job but not at work 3 082 2 960 122 5 9 5 6 3. Both sexes 16 to 19 years,Total employed 5 540 5 719 179 100 0 100 0. At work 5 357 5 492 135 96 7 96 0 7,35 hours or more 1 488 1 485 3 26 9 26 0 9. 1to 34 hours 3 869 4 007 138 69 8 70 0 2, Part time for economic reasons 623 430 193 11 2 7 5 3 7. Usually work full time 104 77 27 1 9 1 3 5,Usually work part time 519 353 166 9 4 6 2 3 2. Part time for noneconomic reasons 3 246 3 577 331 58 6 62 5 3 9. Usually work full time 150 195 45 2 7 3 4 7, Usually work part time 3 096 3 382 286 55 9 59 1 3 2.
With a job but not at work 183 227 44 3 3 4 0 7, 1 These estimates differ slightly from previously published 1993 aver 2 These differences may not equal the results obtained fro m co mpar. ages because of the estimation procedure used ing the values shown in the table because of independent rounding. The new questionnaire appears to result in more accu proportion of wage and salary workers in the parallel sur. rate classification of workers who are temporarily absent vey The level of self employment among women was 4 8. This may reflect several changes the elimination of the million in the parallel survey com pared with 4 1 million in. major activity question the inclusion of separate direct the CPS which was equal to most of the increase in female. questions on temporary absence and on layoff and the re employment in the parallel survey Thus the improved. vamping of the question on the reason for absences Re questions on work activity and the addition of questions. garding the major activity question in the former ques on work in a family business resulted in more women being. tionnaire some responses may have given interviewers the properly classified as self employed. impression that those respondents had a job from which. they were absent when in fact they did not have a job at all. Also the direct questions on layoff in the new question Occupation and industry The distribution of employed. naire allow some people to be properly classified as unem persons according to the occupation and industry of their. ployed or not in the labor force rather than being erro job shifted somewhat under the new questionnaire See. neously counted as absent from a job table 6 For men the parallel survey had a larger propor. To emphasize the im portant role played by the series of tion employed in the managerial professional and techni. questions on temporary absence it is estimated that most cal categories and a smaller proportion in sales occupa. of the drop in men s em ployment level in the parallel sur tions The data suggest that the large decrease in the num. vey was attributed to a lower estimate for persons tempo ber of men who were employed but absent from their jobs. rarily absent The other category of employed persons in the parallel survey may have reduced their representa. those at work was essentially the same for men on both tion in occupations such as sales in which employment. surveys arrangements may be more tenuous, Looking at the industry distributions for men the paral. lel survey had a higher proportion in manufacturing and. Class of worker In the aggregate the distribution of educational services and a smaller proportion in retail. employed persons by their class of worker status dif trade mining public administration and private house. fered little between the two surveys Wage and salary holds As a partial explanation of these differences it is hy. workers comprised about 88 percent of all workers in both pothesized that the classification of fewer men as tempo. the CPS and the parallel survey This classification is fur rarily absent from work as a result of the revised question. ther broken down into private and government workers naire reduces their representation in industries with more. Again there were no significant differences between the informal or irregular employment such as trade and pri. surveys with the private sector accounting for about 73 vate households. percent and the government sector accounting for about Among women a higher proportion in the parallel sur. 15 percent of all employed persons Nearly all of the re vey were working in managerial and farming occupations. maining 12 percent were classified as self employed on This is consistent with evidence presented earlier that the. both surveys See table 5 new questionnaire is measuring more women working in. Only a small fraction of all workers were classified as family businesses or farms and in their own businesses. unpaid family workers in the CPS and the proportion was A smaller proportion were in administrative support and. even smaller in the parallel survey This may seem surpris private household positions. ing given the changes to the questionnaire designed to The distribution by industry for women showed that. identify workers in family businesses In fact the new only one industry agriculture had a higher proportion of. questions were successful however many persons re workers in the parallel survey than in the CPS Evidence. ported as working in family businesses were also found to suggests that the former survey may have underestimated. have received payor profit from the business and thus employment of women in agriculture by 25 percent Pro. were classified as wage and salary workers Even in agri portions as measured by the parallel survey were lower in. culture where unpaid family workers are far more preva public administration and private households. lent than in most other industries the new questions re. sulted in a smaller proportion of such workers In sum the Earnings Median weekly earnings of full time wage and. redesign s efforts to more accurately identify workers in salary workers were somewhat higher under the revised. family businesses resulted in more wage and salary work questionnaire 462 than under the CPS 450 The. ers compared with the former procedures parallel survey found higher median earnings for men but. Looking at the class of worker data by gender the new no difference in earnings for women Among part time. series of questions obtained quite different results for men workers total earnings and those for men were also slight. and women For men the parallel survey had a higher pro ly higher in the parallel survey See table 7. portion in wage and salary work and a smaller proportion Both in the parallel survey and in the full CPS estimates. in self employment For women the findings were just the of earnings are based on data collected from one quarter of. reverse a higher proportion of self em ployed and a lower the sample each month It should be noted that due to the. Table 5 Employed persons by class of worker and sex using 1980 census based population estimates from the CPS and the. parallel survey 1993 annual averages,Thousands of persons Percent distribution. Class of worker and sex Parallel,CPS1 Parallel Differ CPS1 Differ. survey ence2 survey ence2,Total employed 119 389 119 606 217 100 0 100 0.
Agriculture 3 080 3 175 95 2 6 2 7 1,Wage and salary workers 1 488 1 487 1 1 2 1 2 0. Private industries 1 476 1 439 37 1 2 1 2 0,Government 12 48 36 3 3. SeH employed workers 1 488 1 632 144 1 2 1 4 1,Incorporated 159 172 13 1 1 0. Other 1 328 1 460 132 1 1 1 2 1,Unpaid family workers. Nonagricultural industries, Wage and salary workers 103 703 103 897 194 86 9 86 9 0.
Private industries 85 194 85 835 641 71 4 71 8 4,Government 18 509 18 062 447 15 5 15 1 4. SeH employed workers 12 397 12 369 28 10 4 10 3 0,Incorporated 3 413 3 759 346 2 9 3 1 3. Other 8 984 8 611 373 7 5 7 2 3,Unpaid family workers 208 166 42 2 1 0. Total employed 64 727 64 200 527 100 0 100 0,Agriculture 2 444 2 366 78 3 8 3 7 1. Wage and salary workers 1 149 1 184 35 1 8 1 8 1,Private industries 1 142 1 165 23 1 8 1 8 1.
Government 8 18 10 3 3,SeH employed workers 00 1 257 1 158 99 1 9 1 8 1. Incorporated 132 113 19 2 2,Other 1 125 1 045 80 1 7 1 6 1. Unpaid family workers 37 24 13 1 3, Nonagricultural industries 62 284 61 835 449 96 2 96 3 1. Wage and salary workers 53 685 53 758 73 82 9 83 7 8. Private industries 45 297 45 480 183 70 0 70 8 9,Government 8 387 8 278 109 13 0 12 9 1. Self employed workers 8 554 8 022 532 13 2 12 5 7,Incorporated 2 656 2 703 47 4 1 4 2 1.
Other 5 898 5 319 579 9 1 8 3 8,Unpaid family workers 45 54 9 1 1 0. Total employed 54 662 55 406 744 100 0 100 0,Agriculture 636 808 172 1 2 1 5 3. Wage and salary workers to 338 303 35 6 5 1,Private industries 334 274 60 6 5 1. Government,Self employed workers,Incorporated 28 59 31 1 1 1. Other 203 415 212 4 7 4,Unpaid family workers 67 31 36 1 1 1.
Nonagricultural industries 54 025 54 597 572 98 8 98 5 3. Wage and salary workers 50 019 50 139 120 91 5 90 5 1 0. Private industries 39 897 40 355 458 73 0 72 8 2,Government 1 10 122 9 784 338 18 5 17 7 9. Self employed workers 3 844 4 347 503 7 0 7 8 8,Incorporated 757 1 056 299 1 4 1 9 5. Other 3 087 3 291 204 5 6 5 9 3,Unpaid family workers 163 111 52 3 2 1. 1 These estimates differ slightly from previously published 1993 aver in the values shown in the table because of independent rounding. ages because of the estimation procedure used Less than 0 05 percent. 2 These differences may not equal the results obtained from compar.


Related Books

LR2-D thermal relay - ck-electrical.com

LR2 D thermal relay ck electrical com

LR2-D thermal relay Applications This series of thermal relay can be used in the circuit of 50Hz or 60Hz, rated insulation volt-age 660V, rated current 0.1-96A for protecting the phase break when the electric motor is overload. The relay has different mechanism and temperature compensation & can be pluged in KLC1-D series AC contactor. It is ...

Safety Culture Policy Statement: Core values & Behaviors ...

Safety Culture Policy Statement Core values amp Behaviors

Safety Culture Policy Statement. Definition of Safety Culture Safety culture is the core values and behaviors resulting from a collective commitment by leaders and individuals to emphasize safety over competing goals to ensure protection of people and the environment.

Product Data - Carriercca.com

Product Data Carriercca com

3 FEATURES AND BENEFITS (cont.) Coil flexibility Model 40RU direct- expansion coils have galvanized steel casings; inlet and outlet connections are on the same end.

AERA Online Paper Repository

AERA Online Paper Repository

interviews, Aboriginal students and community members express their views of the characteristics of effective teachers and effective teaching. Considering that the national education discourse in Australia is monopolised by discussion on teaching and teacher quality, we problematize this discourse based upon what members of the local Aboriginal

Embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ...

Embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

The need for embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives within schools is based on the premise that increased understanding is needed to build corporate knowledge within the Northern Territory Department of Education and Training (NTDET) that is responsive to the needs of an important client group.

Row Art No. Product Name 101613.0500 101613.1000 101614

Row Art No Product Name 101613 0500 101613 1000 101614

Row Art No. Product Name 1 101613.0500 Agar-agar ultrapure, granulated for microbiology 2 101613.1000 Agar-agar ultrapure, granulated for microbiology 3 101614.1000 Agar-agar granulated, purified and free from inhibitors for microbiology 4 101800.0500 Alkaline Peptone Water for microbiology 5 116387.0001 Anaerobic jar 2,5 l-volume for microbiology 6 107040.0001 Petri-dish rack for up to 12 ...

Gateway to primary care cancer education

Gateway to primary care cancer education

The Martian Trajectory - NASA

The Martian Trajectory NASA

An Examination of \The Martian" Trajectory Laura Burke NASA Glenn Research Center Cleveland, OH October 5, 2015 1 Introduction This analysis was performed to support a request to examine the trajectory of the Hermes vehicle in the novel \The Martian" by Andy Weir[1]. Weir devel-

Roll of Successful Examinees in the REGISTERED ELECTRICAL ...

Roll of Successful Examinees in the REGISTERED ELECTRICAL

17 abeto, ian van dandan 18 abito, amiel andulan 19 abola, john louie funtinilla 20 abrantes, leonil trasmonte ... 231 bontogon, matthew alexander cabrido 232 borja, jasmine eve sumalpong 233 borja, wynci folloso 234 borrico, walter tampadong ...

Student # Student Name Program Academic Adviser

Student Student Name Program Academic Adviser

Student # Student Name Program Academic Adviser 2012107320 ABABAT, KIM JOSHUA (VERGARA) CHE Soriano, Allan 2015102194 ABASTILLAS, KER (ADORINO) CHE Barquilla, Florinda M.