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Preventing Child Sexual Abuse Within Youth serving
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Preventing Child Sexual Abuse, Within Youth serving Organizations. Getting Started on Policies, and Procedures, U S DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Division of Violence Prevention, Atlanta Georgia, Preventing Child Sexual Abuse Within Youth serving Organizations Getting Started on Policies and. Procedures is a publication of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control of the Cen. ters for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Julie L Gerberding M D M P H Director, Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury Prevention. Henry Falk M D M P H Director, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Ileana Arias Ph D Director, Division of Violence Prevention. W Rodney Hammond Ph D Director, Suggested citation Saul J Audage NC Preventing Child Sexual Abuse Within Youth serving Organizations. Getting Started on Policies and Procedures Atlanta GA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control 2007. Janet Saul Ph D, Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.
Natalie C Audage M P H, Consultant and former ASPH CDC Fellow. Acknowledgements, The authors would like to acknowledge the individuals and organizations that participated in the. meeting of experts sponsored by CDC in August 2004 The authors would also like to thank. Kristin Leydig Bryant for facilitating the meeting and Deborah A Ausburn Attorney at Law. for reviewing the document, Table of Contents, Introduction 1. Components of Child Sexual Abuse Prevention 3, Screening and selecting employees and volunteers 4. Guidelines on interactions between individuals 9, Monitoring behavior 13.
Ensuring safe environments 15, Responding to inappropriate behavior breaches in policy and allegations. and suspicions of child sexual abuse 17, Training about child sexual abuse prevention 22. Training employees volunteers 24, Training caregivers 27. Training youth 28, Overcoming Challenges to Child Sexual Abuse Prevention in. Youth serving Organizations 29, Conclusion Moving Forward 33.
Organizational processes for developing and implementing child sexual abuse. prevention policies 33, Child sexual abuse prevention planning tool for organizations 35. Appendixes, Appendix A Participant List 39, Appendix B Resource List and Sample Policies 42. Books Publications Videos Workshops 42, Journal articles 47. Sample policies from participating organizations 47. Publications with sample policies and procedures 48. Relevant organizations 49, Introduction, outh serving organizations strive to create a safe environment for youth. employees and volunteers so that youth can grow learn and have fun Part of. creating a safe environment is making sure that youth are not harmed in any way. while participating in organization sponsored activities One risk in any organization. working directly with youth is child sexual abuse, It is vital that organizations create a culture where child sexual abuse is discussed.
addressed and prevented, This report is designed for representatives of youth serving organizations who. are interested in adopting strategies to prevent child sexual abuse Whether these. strategies are developed within the context of an overall risk management plan. or are addressed separately organizations need to examine how they can protect. youth from sexual abuse, Definitions, Children and youth. Anyone between the ages of zero and 17 years In this document. these terms are used interchangeably, Child sexual abuse. Child sexual abuse involves any sexual activity with a child where consent is not or can. not be given This includes sexual contact that is accomplished by force or threat of force. regardless of the age of the participants and all sexual contact between an adult and a. child regardless of whether there is deception or the child understands the sexual nature. of the activity Sexual contact between an older and a younger child also can be abusive if. there is a significant disparity in age development or size rendering the younger child. incapable of giving informed consent The sexually abusive acts may include sexual. penetration sexual touching or non contact sexual acts such as exposure or voyeurism 1. Legal definitions vary by state so look up your state guidelines using the Child Welfare. Information Gateway www childwelfare gov systemwide laws policies search index cfm. What You Will Find in This Report, In the first section you will find six key components of child sexual abuse prevention for organi. zations These components were identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC in conjunction with experts, 1 Screening and selecting employees and volunteers.
2 Guidelines on interactions between individuals, 3 Monitoring behavior. 4 Ensuring safe environments, 5 Responding to inappropriate behavior breaches in policy and allegations and suspicions of. child sexual abuse, 6 Training about child sexual abuse prevention. Myers JEB Berliner L Briere J Hendrix CT Jenny C Reid TA editors The APSAC handbook of child maltreatment. 2nd ed Thousand Oaks CA Sage Publications 2002 p 55. Each component is described in detail including the prevention goals critical strategies and ad. ditional strategies that could be considered depending on the context and resources of individual. organizations, The sections that follow offer suggestions for addressing challenges to developing and implement. ing a strategy to prevent child sexual abuse and provide tools to help organizations move forward. A list of publications and organizations that can provide helpful information is provided in. Appendix B, Contextual Issues, Every organization does not have to take on all strategies presented in this document The process.
of implementing child sexual abuse prevention strategies takes time and will evolve differently in. each organization Not all strategies presented in this document will apply to all organizations. However it is very important that organizations abide by their youth protection policies and pro. cedures to avoid being criticized for not adhering to them if a youth is sexually abused Adoption. of strategies will depend on the following contextual issues. Organization s mission and individual activities For example though all youth serving. organizations are interested in helping youth develop into healthy adults the mission of. mentoring or religious organizations is often focused on fostering nurturing relationships. between individual adults and youth Because this mission results in more one on one. activities between employees volunteers and youth these organizations need to adopt child. sexual abuse prevention strategies that protect youth in one on one situations with adults. Culture and language of youth served by the organization. Insurance requirements, Available resources, State and national laws Organizations should consult with legal representation and review. state and national laws before adopting and implementing child sexual abuse prevention. strategies A good place to start is the Child Welfare Information Gateway which provides. state specific information www childwelfare gov systemwide laws policies search index cfm. Balancing Caution and Caring, The same dynamics that create a nurturing environment and may ultimately protect against child. sexual abuse can also open the doors to sexually abusive behaviors Research has shown that youth. who are emotionally insecure needy and unsupported may be more vulnerable to the attentions of. offenders 2 By promoting close and caring relationships between youth and adults organizations. can help youth feel supported and loved and thus reduce their risk of child sexual abuse But that. same closeness between a youth and an adult can also provide the opportunity for abuse to occur. When developing policies for child sexual abuse prevention organizations must balance the need. to keep youth safe with the need to nurture and care for them. Finkelhor D Four preconditions a model In Finkelhor D editor Child sexual abuse new theory and research. New York NY The Free Press 1984 p 53 68, Components of Child Sexual Abuse. Prevention, he components that follow were identified during. a meeting of experts sponsored by CDC in August, 2004 The experts included advocates child sexual.
abuse researchers professionals who provide preven. tion resources for organizations and representatives. of youth serving organizations that have child sexual. abuse prevention programs For a list of meeting, participants see Appendix A. Component 1, Screening and Selecting Employees and Volunteers. To select the best possible people for staff and volunteer positions and to screen out individuals. who have sexually abused youth or are at risk to abuse. General Principles, Screening for child sexual abuse prevention should be integrated into the general screening and. selection process that organizations already employ to choose the best possible candidates for posi. tions Child sexual abuse prevention should be one of the many areas considered when deciding. whom to select While employee volunteer screening and selection are important they should not. be the only efforts adopted to prevent child sexual abuse. Before you start screening, Develop criteria that define how screening information will be used to determine an appli. cant s suitability, Identify who will make the final selection.
Define areas of concern such as a fixation on a particular age or gender of youth or a history. of crimes related to sex or violence, Develop consistent and systematic policies and processes for screening and selection includ. ing a sequence and timeline for the various components of the process. Consult with an attorney to ensure that your screening and selection policies do not violate. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act or other federal or state laws prohibiting discrimination in. the workplace, Who should be screened, Screen all applicants both adults and adolescents for all positions that will have contact. with youth, Consider more in depth written applications and personal interviews for adolescents for. whom work history and criminal background checks may be unavailable. Rigorously screen applicants who will have more autonomy as employees or volunteers. Do not make exceptions for people you know or have worked with in the past. Critical Strategies for Screening and Selecting Employees and Volunteers. These strategies are presented in roughly the order that they should be completed. Education about your organization and youth protection policies. By letting applicants know your organization is serious about protecting youth you may deter. some people at risk of abusing youth from applying for staff or volunteer positions. Inform applicants about your organization s policies and procedures relevant to child sexual. abuse prevention, Share your code of conduct or ethics. Require applicants to sign a document describing the policies and procedures of your orga. nization to demonstrate their understanding and agreement. Ask applicants if they have a problem with any of the policies and procedures. Written application, The written application provides the information you need to assess the background and inter.
ests of applicants Questions should help you determine whether applicants have mature adult. relationships as well as clear boundaries and ethical standards for their conduct with youth The. sidebar on page 6 may help you develop appropriate questions. Ask about previous work and volunteer experiences, Ask questions pertinent to child sexual abuse screening. Provide a permission form for contacting personal references and performing a criminal. background check The permission statement should include an indemnification clause. developed by an attorney to protect your organization from false allegations or other legal. Ask open ended questions that encourage broad answers These will provide material for. follow up in the personal interview and throughout the screening and selection process. Use disclosure statements to ask applicants about previous criminal histories of sexual of. fenses violence against youth and other criminal offenses The applicant may not disclose. past offenses but the inquiry will demonstrate your organization s seriousness about protect. ing youth and potentially discourage applicants at risk for perpetrating child sexual abuse. Clarify that you are interested in learning about an applicant s past perpetration of child. sexual abuse rather than a history of victimization. Personal interview, The personal interview provides an opportunity to. meet applicants determine if they are a good fit for. your organization and ask additional questions to, screen for child sexual abuse risk factors The sidebar. on page 6 may help you develop interview questions. Ask open ended questions that encourage, discussion. Clarify and expand upon the applicant s, answers to questions from the written.
application, Questions for Screening and Selecting Employees and Volunteers. The following questions may be used in a written application or personal interview A. single answer should not determine whether an applicant is selected or rejected Along. Preventing Child Sexual Abuse Within Youth serving Organizations Getting Started on Policies and Procedures is a publication of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control of the Cen ters for Disease Control and Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Julie L Gerberding M D M P H Director Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury Prevention Henry

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