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First Time Parent Group Resource Maternal Child Health
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First Time Parent Group,Resource and Facilitation Guide for. Maternal and Child Health Nurses, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. Project Consultants and Authors The 150 maternal and child health nurses who. attended the eight One Day First Time Parent,Professor Gay Edgecombe Clinical Chair. Group Workshops gave the Project Team, Community Child Health Nursing RMIT valuable feedback on the developing Guide. Susanne White Director The Resolutions The maternal and child health nurses who. Group Pty Ltd gave feedback on the Guide after trialling it in. Geraldine Marsh Consultant The Resolutions their First Time Parent Groups between. Group Pty Ltd October 1997 and February 1998,Carol Jackson Senior Lecturer Child and.
Parent Group Resource Guide,Family Health Nursing RMIT. Reference Group,Dr Barbara Hanna Senior Lecturer School of. A project Parent Group Resource Guide, Nursing Deakin University Reference Group was established to provide. Sue Newman Maternal and Child Health expert advice The members of the Reference. Nurse City of Greater Geelong Group were,Prue Ingram Acting Manager Family. Acknowledgments Services Department of Human Services. The Project Team wishes to thank those people Steve Ballard Manager Community Child. consulted during the development of the Health Department of Human Services. Guide Miranda Adams Program Adviser, Patricia Glynn Maternal and Child Health Community Child Health Department of.
Nurse Wyndham City Human Services, Catriona Good Maternal and Child Health Warren Cann Senior Program Adviser. Nurse City of Darebin Parenting and Neighbourhood Services. Raelene Howgate Maternal and Child Health Department of Human Services. Nurse Whitehorse City Vanessa Gati Regional Parenting Resource. Sue Newman Maternal and Child Health Service Western Metropolitan Region. Nurse City of Greater Geelong Dr Dorothy Scott Deputy Head School of. Katrina Pfarrer Maternal and Child Health Social Work The University of Melbourne. Nurse City of Greater Geelong Marianne Mackay Lecturer Coordinator. Hilary Robinson Maternal and Child Health Community Child and Family Health. Nurse City of Greater Geelong Nursing School of Nursing Faculty of Health. Faye Stanesby Maternal and Child Health Sciences La Trobe University. Nurse City of Yarra Nola Green Maternal and Child Health. Paula Walsh Maternal and Child Health Nurse City of Yarra. Nurse City of Greater Geelong,Sue Walsh Maternal and Child Health Nurse. City of Darebin ISBN 0 7306 5078 2,Acknowledgements. Writen by G Edgecombe S White G Marsh C Jackson B Hanna S Newman D Scott. Published by the Victorian Government Department of Human Services Melbourne Victoria. April 2001,Department of Human Services, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. Section One, Introduction to First Time Parent Group Resource and Facilitation.
Guide for Maternal and Child Health Nurses,1 1 Introduction 3. 1 2 Aims of the Guide 4,1 3 How Was the Guide Developed 5. 1 3 1 Background to the First Time Parents Sessions 6. 1 4 How to Use the Guide 7,1 5 Information about the Guide 8. 1 6 References 9,Section Two,Social Interaction and Health. 2 1 Introduction 11,2 2 Benefits of Social Support 12.
2 3 Facilitator s Role and Related Benefits 13,2 4 References 14. Section Three,Benefits of New Parents Support Groups. 3 1 Introduction 17, 3 2 Parents Perceptions of the Value of First Time Parent Groups 17. 3 3 Maternal and Child Health Nurses Perceptions of the Value of First time 19. Parent Groups,3 4 Conclusion 20,CONTENTS iii, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. Section Four, Tips for Organising and Facilitating First Time Parent Groups.
4 1 Introduction 21, 4 2 Successful First Time Parent Group Session Factors 21. 4 3 Role of Facilitator 21, 4 4 Encouraging Sustainable Connections Between Participants 22. 4 5 Group Guidelines or Rules 22, 4 6 Handling Difficult People in the Group Sessions 23. 4 7 What to Do about Drop Outs 24,4 8 Evaluating the Sessions 24. 4 9 Debriefing the Facilitator 24,4 10 Engaging Experts 24.
4 11 Inviting Participants 24,4 12 Times Days and Venues 25. 4 13 Engaging Fathers 25,4 14 Maintaining and Continuing the Group 25. 4 15 Developing and Improving Facilitation Skills 26. Section Five,About the First Time Parent Group Sessions. 5 1 Introduction 27,5 2 The Purpose of the Group Sessions 28. 5 3 Maternal and Child Health Nurse as Group Facilitator 28. 5 3 1 Accessing Resources for Parents and Maternal and Child Health Nurses 29. 5 3 2 Accessing Resources for Culturally Specific Groups 29. 5 4 The Session Designs 30,5 5 Choosing the Sessions for Parent Groups 31.
5 6 Notes on the Strategies Used in Following Sessions 32. 5 7 Promoting Discussion in Groups 34,5 8 Assertiveness and First Time Parent Groups 34. This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. Section Six,Suggested First Time Parent Group Sessions. 6 1 Getting to Know Each Other Beginning Our Group 35. 6 1 1 Planning the Session 35,6 1 2 Workshop Session 36. Conversation Starters 38,6 2 Being a Parent Changes and Challenges 39. 6 2 1 Planning the Session 39,6 2 2 Workshop Session 41.
6 3 Getting to Know Your Baby 43,6 3 1 Planning the Session 43. 6 3 2 Workshop Session 44, 6 4 Looking After Yourself Exploring Mother s Health 47. 6 4 1 Planning the Session 47,6 4 2 Workshop Session 49. Raindrops Massage Text 52,Script for Raindrops Massage 53. 6 5 Baby s Ages and Stages What to Expect 55,6 5 1 Planning the Session 55.
6 5 2 Workshop Session 57,6 6 Managing Childhood Illnesses 61. 6 6 1 Planning the Session 61,6 6 2 Workshop Session 62. Visiting a Health Professional 65,6 7 What to do in an Emergency 1 Resuscitation 67. 6 7 1 Planning the Session 67,6 7 2 Workshop Session 69. 6 8 What to do in an Emergency 2 First Aid 71,6 8 1 Planning the Session 71.
6 8 2 Workshop Session 73, 6 9 Keeping Your Child Safe Preventing Accidents 75. 6 9 1 Planning the Session 75,6 9 2 Workshop Session 77. 6 10 A Settled Baby What Does it Mean 81,6 10 1Planning the Session 81. 6 10 2Workshop Session 83,CONTENTS v, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. 6 11 Food Your Baby and the Family 87,6 11 1 Planning the Session 87.
6 11 2 Workshop Session 89, 6 12 Teething and Looking After Baby s Teeth for Life 91. 6 12 1Planning the Session 91,6 12 2Workshop Session 93. 6 13 Returning to Paid Work 95,6 1 1 Planning the Session 95. 6 1 2 Workshop Session 96,6 14 Play More than Fun and Games 99. 6 14 1Planning the Session 99,6 14 2Workshop Session 100.
6 15 Being a New Parent in Australia and Other Countries 103. 6 15 1Planning the Session 103,6 15 2Workshop Session 104. 6 16 Communicating With Your Baby Through Music and Books 107. 6 16 1Planning the Session 107,6 16 2Workshop Session 108. Music and Your Baby 110,6 17 Where to From Here 111. 6 17 1Planning the Session 111,6 17 2Workshop Session 112. Section Seven,Resources for Nurses, 7 1 Figure 1 Model for Parent s Perception of Core Benefits of.
First Time parent Group 115,7 2 Invitation 116,7 3 Pre Group Information 117. 7 4 Group Session Outline and Roster 118,7 5 Evaluation 119. 7 6 Attendance Record 120, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. 1 Introduction to the First Time Parent Group,Resource and Facilitation Guide for Maternal and. Child Health Nurses,1 1 Introduction, Welcome to the First Time Parent Group Resource and Facilitation Guide for Maternal and Child.
Health Nurses The Guide This Guide has been designed to assist maternal and child health. nurses in their facilitation of the first time parent groups for which they are responsible. First Time Parent Groups are funded by the Department of Human Services in recognition of the. challenges and stresses that may be associated with the transition to parenthood Department of. Human Services 1997 p 3 The purpose of groups for first time parents is to. Enhance parental and emotional well being,Enhance parent child interaction. Provide opportunities for first time parents to establish informal networks and social. Increase parental confidence and independence in child rearing. Parenting groups have been provided by maternal and child health nurses since the 1920s. However it was not until 1994 that funding was formally allocated for first time mothers. groups by the then Department of Health and Community Services now the Department of. Human Services The name of the groups was changed to First Time Parent Groups in 1997 8. in recognition of the role fathers play in parenting The role of fathers as members of the First. Time Parent Groups is developing, The Guide provides information about the theory and research which underpin the funding of. First Time Parent Groups and the consequent emphasis within the Guide on promoting social. interaction both within the formal group sessions facilitated by the nurse and outside the. sessions as well, The primary focus of the Guide is the role of the maternal and child health nurse as a group. facilitator Most sections of the Guide are dedicated to the work of group facilitation There are. some tips for running effective groups and a series of sessions detailed Nurses can select. directly from these sessions for their groupwork or they can adapt them to suit the needs of. their groups and their own facilitation styles There are some materials which can be copied. directly or again adapted for use by maternal and child health nurses Throughout the Guide. there are current references which have been provided for nurses and group participants to. Numbers of maternal and child health nurses have been successfully facilitating first time. parent groups for years Many of the ideas within the Guide have been drawn from their. experience and others have been developed to address the concerns which have been identified. by nurses during the research and trialling phases conducted in preparation of this Guide. 1 INTRODUCTION 3, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. 1 2 Aims of the Guide,The specific aims of the Guide are to.
Enhance maternal and child health nurses knowledge and skills in providing first time. parent groups,Provide information on the facilitation of groups. Provide a range of group topic outlines, Provide a range of group models for increased flexibility. Provide information on suitable resources for groups. First time parents require a range of information which supports the development of their. parenting skills when they become a new parent The provision of First Time Parent Groups is. one strategy used by Victoria s Maternal and Child Health Service to provide parents with a. range of information while developing a supportive group environment for parents The. Department of Human Services Victoria has formally funded First Time Parent Groups since. January 1994 This new funding initiative was evaluated in 1995 by Deakin University Clarke. Hanna Rolls Grant Bethume Horne and Ching 1995 pp 3 4 The areas of concern identified. The groups should also include fathers and any other persons taking a major role in caring. for the new baby, Consideration should be given to the flexibility of the timing of the groups such as offering. evening or weekend sessions, Greater involvement of participants in selecting the group topics may reduce the mismatch. found between the parents development of long term friendships and informal social. networks and nurses needs more interested in information provision and education. All nurses should evaluate their groups, There is a need to have an interpreter present for some non English speaking groups.
There is a need to provide continuing education for some maternal and child health nurses in. group facilitation, Many Victorian maternal and child health nurses have the knowledge and skills needed for. managing and facilitating First Time Parent Groups and group work generally This Guide is. designed to capitalise on their expertise and provide new information and resources to assist. them with this aspect of their practice, While this Guide will be sufficient stimulus for many nurses in their group facilitation others. may find it advantageous to access some of the one or two day training programs in general. group facilitation which are available at various educational organisations throughout Victoria. The Guide will then be useful for its suggestions in the specific application to the issues of first. time parents, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. 1 3 How Was the Guide Developed, Since 1994 maternal and child health nurses have requested assistance with the development of. a package to assist them to provide high quality First Time Parent Groups across Victoria In. 1997 a project team from RMIT University successfully tendered for a Department of Human. Services Project Brief Development of a First Time Parent Group Resource and Facilitation. Guide for Maternal and Child Health Nurses April 1997. As it was several years since the evaluation of First Time Parent Groups by Deakin University. 1995 the project team undertook a series of focus groups with maternal and child health nurses. and first time parents in 1997 prior to commencing work on the design and layout of the. Resource and Facilitation Guide, Key positive features of the groups identified by parents included.
The groups are fun,Parents value the informality of the groups. The information shared and discussed at the groups. The new relationships developed with other parents. Support received from the group,Support networks discovered through the groups. Parents also commented that they particularly liked the continuing use. of name tags for parents and babies within the groups and secondly the opportunity to. choose their content from a list of group topics, Parents discovered that their maternal and child health nurse had knowledge and skills on a. wide range of topics, The above findings have been illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 1 Model of Parents Perception of Core Benefits of. First Time Parent Groups,Informality,Support First Time Relationships.
Parent Groups,Information,1 INTRODUCTION 5, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. Key issues identified by maternal and child health nurses were. Groups widely used, Not all maternal and child health nurses are providing First Time Parent Groups. Maternal and child health nurses knowledge and skills in group facilitation appears to be at. different levels,Quality of groups not known, Nurses need to be more innovative in how they facilitate groups. Parents don t only attend for information, Getting discussion going and keeping on track is an issue for me. As the recommendations from the Deakin 1995 evaluation and the 1997 focus groups identified. similar issues the project team felt reasonably confident to begin designing the Resource and. Facilitation Guide in August 1997 following the first meeting of the project s Parent Group. Resource Guide Reference Group on July 25 1997, The team recognised that nurses have varying experience in group facilitation and work with.
new parents across all regions of Victoria with a wide range of needs and issues In order to. design a practical and user friendly document to address this range of requirements a draft. Guide was developed and distributed to 150 maternal and child health nurses from all parts of. Victoria who attended one of a series of one day workshops During the workshops the nurses. reviewed the content and layout of the Guide and experienced some of the suggested strategies. as group participants Following these workshops the nurses were invited to trial some of the. strategies with the next groups they were facilitating The feedback from the 150 nurses. provided during the workshops and after their own trials was taken into account and the issues. were addressed in the final production of the Guide. 1 3 1 Background to the First Time Parents Sessions. Maternal and child health nurses have had many years of experience in facilitating groups for. new parents The team which prepared this Guide observed numbers of nurses facilitating First. Time Parent Groups and have incorporated many of their ideas and activities in the sessions. Although nurses have this extensive experience they requested the writing team make the. group processes as simple to prepare as possible The authors determined that the style chosen. for the Guide would provide a step by step simplicity and it is expected that nurses will adapt. the sessions to their own situations groups and time constrictions For example nurses working. with groups with low literacy levels will focus more on discussions than print materials. In addition the Reference Group for the Project was of the view that the Guide needed to pay. particular attention to the process of group facilitation Maternal and child health nurses are. well able to address the content for the Sessions presented in the guide but have had less. opportunities to develop other aspects of group work. This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. The session titles themselves were agreed after extensive consideration They are designed from. the parent perspective In fact this perspective has been used throughout and the content of all. sessions has been planned to be both parent and nurse user friendly. The sessions have been developed through, The experience of maternal and child health nurses who have been facilitating groups for. mothers and or fathers for many years, A process of consultation with a range of maternal and child health nurses and first time. parents currently participating in groups, Consideration of recommendations in recent literature which addressed the content and style. of first time parent groups particularly Lawson and Callaghan 1991 and Moran and Martin. Discussion with older parents about the sorts of issues they would have liked to discuss as. well as what they had found valuable,1 4 How to Use the Guide. Sections Two and Three of the Guide provide some theory and point to some research about the. increasingly acknowledged value of social interation for first time parents This material has. been provided as the rationale for the focus of the Guide on promoting social interaction. through and within the First Time Parent Groups It has also been included to encourage. maternal and child health nurses to place an emphasis on their group facilitation. responsibilities since during the preparation of the Guide nurses frequently commented on the. difficulty of giving the time for planning and organising their group facilitation when there were. many other competing priorities especially for one to one consultations. Sections Four to Seven of the Guide have been designed to assist maternal and child health. nurses to meet two key objectives in their facilitation of first time parent groups These. objectives are, To develop a cohesive group with sustainable links between individual.
participants, To provide information and develop skills where appropriate which are. critical to the role and tasks of new parents, The Guide highlights the group and discussion facilitator roles in which maternal and child. health nurses need to become expert rather than the presenter role that some nurses still use in. order to get through the information parents need to be aware of This facilitator role enables. nurses to empower parents to play an active role in the group process and development of. knowledge about parenting In preparation of the session guides the authors were very aware. that nurses need to switch hats quickly from providing individual consultations to facilitating. groups and so a detailed step by step process was used throughout the seventeen session. 1 INTRODUCTION 7, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. Seventeen different group session designs are provided in the Guide to enable selection. according to the interests information and skill needs of the groups Most First Time Parent. Groups run for a period of eight weeks and so it assumed that while a version of the first and. last sessions will be used in common the other six sessions will be selected and mixed and. matched for different groups Most groups run for approximately two hours and each session. has been designed to cover that time period although it is possible to shorten each session if. that is required Each session has an introductory time to enable the group to re form and a. closure time It is anticipated that some of the activities suggested for these times will be mixed. and matched in different sessions, The session titles have been designed to reflect the language used by parents rather than the. language maternal and child health nurses may traditionally use However the titles do reflect. the issues topics and or information that parents have been asking maternal and child health. nurses about for many years, The sessions have been designed to include both parents but at the time of writing it is.
acknowledged that the usual group participant is the mother The time of day at which the. group is conducted affects participation Some sessions such as What to do in an Emergency 1. Resuscitation and What to do in an Emergency 2 First Aid lend themselves to promotion to. both parents perhaps in an evening session, Finally as there is a need for all nurses to evaluate their First Time Parent Groups some. examples of evaluation tools have been included in the final section These may be used directly. or adapted to meet the needs of the different users. 1 5 Information about the Guide, If you need information about the Resource and Facilitation Guide contact Gay Edgecombe. through the Office of Clinical Chair Community Child Health Nursing. Telephone 03 9925 4321 Business Hours,Fax 03 9925 4398. Email gay edgecombe rmit edu au,Mailing Address,Professor Gay Edgecombe. Clinical Chair Community Child Health Nursing,City Campus.
GPO Box 2476V,Melbourne 3001, This package is funded by the Victorian Department of Human Services. This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. 1 6 References, Department of Human Services 1997 Project Brief Development of a First Time Parents Resource. and Facilitation Guide for Maternal and Child Health Nurses Department of Human Services. Publication Melbourne, Department of Human Services 1997 Maternal and Child Health Program Annual Report. 1995 1996 Department of Human Services Publication Melbourne. Clarke V Hanna B Rolls C Grant A Bethume E Horne R and Ching M 1995 Evaluation. of Group Sessions for First Time Mothers Provided by the Victorian Maternal and Child Health Service. Deakin University Melbourne, Lawson J S and Callaghan A 1991 Recreating the village the development of groups to. improve social relationships among mothers of newborn infants in Australia Australian Journal. of Public Health 15 1 pp 64 66, Moran C and Martin D 1997 What do Women Want to Know after Childbirth in Birth.
24 1 27 34,1 INTRODUCTION 9, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007. 2 Social Interaction and Health,2 1 Introduction, It is well established that the transition to parenthood is a stressful time and the need for social. support paramount Why is this It is now known that integration into a social network protects. health and promotes recovery Bloom 1990 In addition social support enhances health. outcomes and reduces mortality by fulfilling basic social needs and enhancing social integration. mediating the effects of stress on health and protecting individuals from harmful influences of. acute stressful events Quittner Gleuckouf and Jackson 1990 The need for social support. networks is recognised as an important feature of health care delivery for parents as women are. leaving hospital earlier than before following the birth of a child Stewart and Tilden 1995. An Australian study by Rogan Shmied Barclay Everitt and Wylie 1997 reports the hurdles. new parents face as monumental leaving many women initially feeling drained alone and with. a sense of loss Research by Majewski 1987 and others suggests that partners provide new. mothers with the greatest levels of support They also identified a different type of support. which is provided through parent groups According to Majewski such groups offer parental. guidance and a network of friends which is sustained over time It is through social support that. individuals gain information see new role models and are encouraged by others Bloom 1990. In a publication by the World Health Organisation WHO and the International Centre for. Health and Society The Solid Facts Social Determinants of Health 1998 p 1 10 an attempt is. made to examine research and present it in a useful format for policy makers managers and. health care providers The ten social determinants of health referred to in this publication are. 1 The social gradient People s social and economic circumstances strongly affect their health. throughout life so health policy must be linked to the social and economic determinants of. 2 Stress Stress harms health Social and psychological circumstances can cause long term. 3 Early life The effects of early development last a life time a good start in life means. supporting mothers and young children, 4 Social exclusion Social exclusion creates misery and costs lives. 5 Work Stress in the workplace increases the risk of disease. 6 Unemployment Job security increases health wellbeing and job satisfaction. 7 Social support Friendship good social relations and strong supportive networks improve. health at home at work and in the community, 8 Addiction Individuals turn to alcohol drugs and tobacco and suffer from their use but use. is influenced by the wider social setting, 9 Food There is a need to ensure access to supplies of healthy food for everyone.
2 SOCIAL INTERACTION AND HEALTH 11, This document is managed by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Victoria as of 27 August 2007.

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