Dmrb Volume 3 Section 4 Part 14 Bd 44 95 The-Books Pdf

DMRB VOLUME 3 SECTION 4 PART 14 BD 44 95 THE
18 Dec 2019 | 91 views | 0 downloads | 85 Pages | 636.43 KB

Share Pdf : Dmrb Volume 3 Section 4 Part 14 Bd 44 95 The

Download and Preview : Dmrb Volume 3 Section 4 Part 14 Bd 44 95 The

Report CopyRight/DMCA Form For : Dmrb Volume 3 Section 4 Part 14 Bd 44 95 The



Transcription

THE HIGHWAYS AGENCY BD 44 95, THE SCOTTISH OFFICE DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT. THE WELSH OFFICE, Y SWYDDFA GYMREIG, THE DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT FOR. NORTHERN IRELAND, Your attention is drawn to Interim Advice Note 4. which has been issued by the Highways Agency for, use on trunk roads and motorways in England. Click here to view this Interim Advice Note, The Assessment of Concrete.
Highway Bridges and Structures, Summary This Standard gives the requirements for the assessment of existing concrete. highway bridges and structures on motorways and trunk roads This Standard. supersedes BD 44 90, ELECTRONIC COPY NOT FOR USE OUTSIDE THE AGENCY. PAPER COPIES OF THIS ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT ARE UNCONTROLLED. Volume 3 Section 4, Part 14 BD 44 95 Registration of Amendments. REGISTRATION OF AMENDMENTS, Amend Page No Signature Date of Amend Page No Signature Date of. No incorporation of No incorporation of, amendments amendments.
1 A46 Equation in clause 5 8 6 3, corrected in electronic. versions only paper, version not affected, Square root correctly. truncated August 2005, August 2005, Volume 3 Section 4. Registration of Amendments Part 14 BD 44 95, REGISTRATION OF AMENDMENTS. Amend Page No Signature Date of Amend Page No Signature Date of. No incorporation of No incorporation of, amendments amendments.
ELECTRONIC COPY NOT FOR USE OUTSIDE THE AGENCY, PAPER COPIES OF THIS ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT ARE UNCONTROLLED January 1995. DESIGN MANUAL FOR ROADS AND BRIDGES, VOLUME 3 HIGHWAY. STRUCTURES, INSPECTION AND, MAINTENANCE, SECTION 4 ASSESSMENT. THE ASSESSMENT OF CONCRETE, HIGHWAY BRIDGES AND, STRUCTURES. 1 Introduction, 3 References, 4 Enquiries, Annex A The Assessment of Concrete Highway.
Bridges and Structures, ELECTRONIC COPY NOT FOR USE OUTSIDE THE AGENCY. January 1995 PAPER COPIES OF THIS ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT ARE UNCONTROLLED. Volume 3 Section 4 Chapter 1, Part 14 BD 44 95 Introduction. 1 INTRODUCTION, 1 1 This Standard which for assessment purposes. replaces BD 24 gives requirements for the assessment of. existing concrete structures and structural elements and. shall be used in conjunction with Standard BD 21 The. Assessment of Highway Bridges and Structures DMRB, 1 2 Appendix A of this standard contains the relevant. assessment clauses which have been presented in the. same format as the design clauses in BS 5400 Part 4 to. assist the engineer carrying out the assessment These. clauses have been specifically developed to suit, assessment conditions and therefore shall not be used in.
new design or construction, 1 3 An Advice Note BA 44 The Assessment of. Concrete Highway Bridges and Structures will, accompany this Standard giving the necessary. background information and also guidance on the, application of this Standard It is recommended that the. Advice Note should be used in conjunction with the. 1 4 This Standard should be used in the assessment. of all concrete elements in highway bridges and structures. on trunk roads and motorways For use in Northern, Ireland this Standard will be applicable to those roads. designated by the Overseeing Organisation, Implementation.
1 5 This standard should be used forthwith on all, bridge maintenance schemes including those currently in. progress provided that in the opinion of the Overseeing. Organisation this would not result in significant, additional expense or delay Design Organisations should. confirm its application to particular schemes with the. Overseeing Organisation, ELECTRONIC COPY NOT FOR USE OUTSIDE THE AGENCY. January 1995 PAPER COPIES OF THIS ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT ARE UNCONTROLLED 1 1. Volume 3 Section 4 Chapter 2, Part 14 BD 44 95 Assessment of Strength. 2 ASSESSMENT OF STRENGTH, General iii Where no information exists on the characteristic.
values used in design, 2 1 The objective of this Standard is to produce a. more realistic assessment of the strength of a concrete 2 6 The worst credible value shall generally be taken. element than has previously been possible using the as the lower bound value of the estimated insitu strength. requirements of the existing design code This is in part for the element under consideration Further guidance on. achieved by taking advantage of the information available the assessment of worst credible strength is given in the. to an assessing engineer which can only be predicted at Appendix A of BA 44. the design stage, 2 7 Worst credible strength for concrete should. 2 2 Many of the criteria given in the design code are generally be derived from tests carried out on cores. based on experimental evidence which in some cases have Cores are destructive and can not normally be taken at the. been either conservatively interpreted for use in design or critical most highly stressed locations of an element. updated by later evidence allowing a less conservative hence interpolation or extrapolation is necessary to arrive. interpretation For assessment purposes such criteria have at worst credible strengths in these locations. been reviewed and amended where appropriate, 2 8 To assist in interpolating or extrapolating the. 2 3 An important feature of the design code is the results of core tests an integrated programme of testing. application of the partial safety factor for material which may include destructive semi destructive eg near. strength m to the characteristic values This approach is surface tests and non destructive tests will be necessary. retained in Appendix A but the concept of worst credible for each element The assessing engineer should use his. strength with a reduced value of m has been introduced judgement in selecting the locations and numbers of. as an alternative samples for such tests, Worst Credible Strength 2 9 For reinforcement or prestressing tendons and. bars a worst credible value should be obtained by testing. 2 4 The term worst credible strength has been samples taken from the element being assessed Removal. introduced in this standard to allow for the actual material of prestressing steel for sampling purposes will alter the. strengths of the structures and structural elements being stress distribution in the concrete section and this must be. used for assessment Worst credible strength can be allowed for in the assessment calculations. defined as the worst value of that strength which the. engineer based on his experience and knowledge of the Partial Safety Factor for Materials m. material realistically believes could be obtained in the. structure of element under consideration This value may 2 10 The values of m for concrete and reinforcing or. be greater or less than the characteristic strength of the prestressing steel given in of BD 21 shall be replaced by. material assumed at the design stage Since this value the appropriate m values given in Appendix A of this. eliminates some of the uncertainties associated with the standard The values for use with the characteristic. use of characteristic strengths reductions may be made in strength are different from those for use with worst. the partial safety factor for material m credible strengths To enable the correct value of m to be. used all limiting criteria have been expressed as formulae. 2 5 Worst credible strengths should be used in the with m stated explicitly rather than as tabulated values. following circumstances, Limit State, i When an initial assessment using characteristic.
values has shown an element of structure to be incapable 2 11 Although this Standard in common with BD 21. of carrying the full assessment loading of BD 21 specifies that assessments shall be carried out at the. ultimate limit state there are some references to, ii If a structure has suffered damage or serviceability requirements These should only be applied. deterioration in such a way that the actual strengths are or if required by the Overseeing Organisation. are thought to be less than the assumed characteristic. values Condition Factor in BD 21, ELECTRONIC COPY NOT FOR USE OUTSIDE THE AGENCY. January 1995 PAPER COPIES OF THIS ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT ARE UNCONTROLLED 2 1. Chapter 2 Volume 3 Section 4, Assessment of Strength Part 14 BD 44 95. 2 12 While the application of the condition factor Fc in. section 5 4 3 of BD 21 is not affected in principle by the. requirements of this Standard care should be taken to. ensure that the estimated values of Fc do not allow for any. deficiencies of the materials in a structure which are. separately allowed for by using worst credible strengths. USE OF APPENDIX A, 2 13 Appendix A is based on BS 5400 Part 4 and. retains the terminology and clause numbering of that. document In cases where the BS 5400 Part 4 clauses are. not required for assessment the numbers and headings of. those clauses have been included to retain the structure of. the document but the words Not applicable to, assessment have been added in italics.
2 14 Wherever possible tabulated values in BS 5400. Part 4 have been replaced by formulae in which m is. stated explicitly, 2 15 Those equations from BS 5400 Part 4 which. have been amended other than simply to incorporate m. have their equation number followed by the letter A. Amended tables and figures retain their BS 5400 Part 4. numbers but the letter A is added to the number, ELECTRONIC COPY NOT FOR USE OUTSIDE THE AGENCY. 2 2 PAPER COPIES OF THIS ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT ARE UNCONTROLLED January 1995. Volume 3 Section 4 Chapter 3, Part 14 BD 44 95 References. 3 REFERENCES, 1 The Design Manual for Roads and Bridges DMRB. BD 9 Implementation of BS5400 Part 10 1980 DMRB 1 3. BD 24 Design of Concrete Bridges, Use of BS 5400 Part 4 1990 DMRB 1 3 1.
BD 37 Loads for Highway Bridges DMRB 1 3, BD 21 The assessment of Highway Bridges. and Structures DMRB 3 4 3, BA 38 Assessment of the Fatigue Life. of Corroded or Damaged Reinforcing Bars DMRB 3 4 5. BA 39 The Assessment of Reinforced, Concrete Half Joints DMRB 3 4 6. BA 44 The Assessment of Concrete Highway Bridges, and Structures DMRB 3 4. 2 British Standards, BS 5400 Part 4 1990 Steel Concrete and.
Composite Bridges Code of Practice for Design, of Concrete Bridges BSI. BS 5400 Part 10 1980 Steel Concrete and, Composite Bridges Code of Practice for Fatigue. British Standard Code of Practice, CP110 Parts 2 3 1972 Use of Concrete BSI. 3 Manual of Contract Documents for, Highway Works MCHW. Specification for Highway Works MCHW 1, ELECTRONIC COPY NOT FOR USE OUTSIDE THE AGENCY.
January 1995 PAPER COPIES OF THIS ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT ARE UNCONTROLLED 3 1. Volume 3 Section 4 Chapter 4, Part 14 BD 44 95 Enquiries. 4 ENQUIRIES, All technical enquiries or comments on this Standard should be sent in writing as appropriate to. The Chief Highway Engineer, The Highways Agency, St Christopher House. Southwark Street T A ROCHESTER, London SE1 OTE Chief Highway Engineer. The Deputy Chief Engineer, The Scottish Office Industry Department.
Roads Directorate, New St Andrew s House N B MACKENZIE. Edinburgh EH1 3TG Deputy Chief Engineer, The Director of Highways. Welsh Office, Y Swyddfa Gymreig, Government Buildings. Ty Glas Road, Llanishen K THOMAS, Cardiff CF4 5PL Director of Highways. Director of Roads Service, Department of the Environment for.
Northern Ireland, Roads Service Headquarters, Clarence Court. 10 18 Adelaide Street W J McCOUBREY, Belfast BT2 8GB Director of Roads Service. ELECTRONIC COPY NOT FOR USE OUTSIDE THE AGENCY, January 1995 PAPER COPIES OF THIS ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT ARE UNCONTROLLED 4 1. Volume 3 Section 4, Part 14 BD 44 95 Appendix A, THE ASSESSMENT OF CONCRETE HIGHWAY. BRIDGES AND STRUCTURES, 2 DEFINITION AND SYMBOLS, 2 1 Definitions.
2 1 1 General, 2 1 2 Partial load factors, 2 1 3 Materials. 2 1 3 1 Strength, 2 1 3 2 Characteristic stress, 2 2 Symbols. 3 LIMIT STATE PHILOSOPHY, 3 1 General, 3 2 Serviceability limit state. 3 3 Ultimate limit state, 4 ASSESSMENT GENERAL, 4 1 Limit state requirements. 4 1 1 Serviceability limit states, 4 1 2 Ultimate limit states.
4 1 3 Other considerations, 4 2 Loads load combination and partial safety. factors fL and f3, 4 2 1 Loads, 4 2 2 Serviceability limit state. 4 2 3 Ultimate limit state, 4 2 4 Deflection, 4 3 Properties of materials. 4 3 1 General, 4 3 2 Material properties, 4 3 2 1 Concrete. 4 3 2 2 Reinforcement and prestressing steel, 4 3 3 Value of m.
4 3 3 1 General, 4 3 3 2 Serviceability limit state. 4 3 3 3 Ultimate limit state, 4 3 3 4 Fatigue, 4 4 Analysis of structure. 4 4 2 Analysis for serviceability limit state, 4 4 2 1 General. 4 4 2 2 Methods of analysis and their requirements. 4 4 3 Analysis for ultimate limit state, 4 5 Analysis of section. 4 5 1 Serviceability limit state, 4 5 2 Ultimate limit state.
4 6 Deflection, 4 7 Fatigue, ELECTRONIC COPY NOT FOR USE OUTSIDE THE AGENCY. May 1995 PAPER COPIES OF THIS ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT ARE UNCONTROLLED A 1. Volume 3 Section 4, Apppendix A Part 14 BD 44 95, 4 8 Combined global and local effects. 4 8 1 General, 4 8 2 Analysis of structure, 4 8 3 Analysis of section. 5 ASSESSMENT REINFORCED CONCRETE, 5 1 1 Introduction. 5 1 2 Limit state assessment of reinforced, 5 1 2 1 Basis of assessment.
5 1 2 2 Durability, 5 1 2 3 Other limit states and considerations<. In cases where the BS 5400 Part 4 clauses are not required for assessment the numbers and headings of those clauses have been included to retain the structure of the document but the words Not applicable to assessment have been added in italics 2 14 Wherever possible tabulated values in BS 5400 Part 4 have been replaced by formulae in

Related Books

New Holland 1048 Bale Mower Operators Manual

New Holland 1048 Bale Mower Operators Manual

nh o 1048 sc nneeww hhoollllaanndd operator s manual 1048 stackcruiser this is a manual produced byjensales inc without the authorization of new holland or it s successors new holland and it s successors are not responsible for the quality or accuracy of this manual trade marks and trade names contained and used herein are those of others and are used here in a descriptive sense to

Advanced Biomass Science and Technology for Bio Based Products

Advanced Biomass Science and Technology for Bio Based Products

Advanced Biomass Science and Technology for Bio Based Products Editors Chung Yun Hse Zehui Jiang and Mon Lin Kuo Associate Editors Feng Fu and Paul Y Burns Developed from a symposium sponsored by Chinese Academy of Forestry amp USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station May 23 25 2007 Beijing China

Published papers about fingerprint and quality control of

Published papers about fingerprint and quality control of

Published papers about fingerprint and quality control oftraditional Chinese medicine Chen Fan HPLC DAD ELSDstudy on the finger print chromatograms ofGinkgo biloba extracts Chinese Journal ofPharmaceuticalAnalysis 20II 31 03 534 538 First author Chen Fan Email 119220 163 com Li Wenbo Han Jianping Gao Jun Ni Qian Hang Taijun High performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint of

Original Article Extraction and antioxidant activity of

Original Article Extraction and antioxidant activity of

Original Article Extraction and antioxidant activity of flavonoids of Morus nigra Rui Zhang Feng1 Qin Wang 2 Wen Zhi Tong Juan Xiong2 Qin Wei 1 Wan Hai Zhou Zhong Qiong Yin2 Xiao Ya Yin 2 Li Ying Wang Ya Qin Chen Yong Hong Lai 2 Hong Yan Huang Qiao Li Luo Lu Wang Ren Yong Jia3 Xu Song 2 Yuan Feng Zou2 Li Xia Li 1Key Lab of Aromatic Plant Resources Exploitation and

Economic Impact of Dengue Illness and the Cost

Economic Impact of Dengue Illness and the Cost

Economic Impact of Dengue Illness and the Cost Effectiveness of Future Vaccination Programs in Singapore Luis R Carrasco1 Linda K Lee2 Vernon J Lee3 4 5 Eng Eong Ooi6 Donald S Shepard7 Tun L Thein2 Victor Gan2 Alex R Cook1 3 8 David Lye2 9 Lee Ching Ng10 Yee Sin Leo2 9 1Department of Statistics and Applied Probability National University of Singapore Singapore Singapore

THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF STANDARDIZATION

THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF STANDARDIZATION

the economic impact 03 of standardization summary summary 04 introduction 06 1 technological change standards and growth in france 07 1 1 the macroeconomic approach the basic model 07 1 2 measuring the impact of standardization 08 1 3 data 09 1 4calculated impact of standardization on total factor productivity 10 1 5 detailed comparison with din estimations 11 1 6 comparative summary of

AN ANALYSIS OF ISSUES SHAPING AFRICA S ECONOMIC FUTURE

AN ANALYSIS OF ISSUES SHAPING AFRICA S ECONOMIC FUTURE

assessing the economic impact of covid 19 and policy responses in sub saharan africa april 2020 volume 21 an analysis of issues shaping africa s economic future

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ECONOMIC IMPACT S ARISING FOR IRELAND

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ECONOMIC IMPACT S ARISING FOR IRELAND

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ECONOMIC IMPACT S ARISING FOR IRELAND FROM THE POTENTIAL FUTURE TRADING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE EU AND UK COMMISSIONED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND INNOVATION JANAURY 2020 AUTHORS Eva Rytter Sunesen Erik Dahlberg Morten May Hansen ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This report is prepared for the Irish Government and has benefitted from valuable inputs and dia logue

Economic Impact ucop edu

Economic Impact ucop edu

AN ECONOMIC ENGINE The University of California generates 46 3 billion in annual economic activity for California and contributes 32 8 billion to the gross state product according to an economic impact report produced by Economic amp Planning Systems Inc That s a strong return on investment for the

Cumulative economic impact of future trade agreements on

Cumulative economic impact of future trade agreements on

Cumulative economic impact of future trade agreements on EU agriculture 2016 EUR 28206 EN This publication is a Science for Policy report by the Joint Research Centre JRC the European Commission s science and knowledge service It aims to provide evidence based scientific support to the European policy making process The scientific output expressed does not imply a policy position of

K Masser Independent Research in Nanjing China History 7840

K Masser Independent Research in Nanjing China History 7840

American Goddess at the Rape of Nanking The Courage of Minnie Vautrin Hu also co edited another book about Minnie and her assistant Mrs Tsen entitled The Undaunted Women of Nanking The Wartime Diaries of Minnie Vautrin and Tsen Shui fang In both of these works Hu