A Strategy Paper From Island Press And The Kresge-Books Pdf

A Strategy Paper from Island Press and The Kresge
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ABOUT ISLAND PRESS, Island Press is a leading source of ideas and inspiration for a sustainable future. As a mission driven nonprofit organization Island Press stimulates shapes and communicates ideas that are. essential to the well being of people and nature We forge partnerships and spark thinking across traditional disci. plines and sectors And we share ideas through multiple channels and platforms in print in person and online. Since 1984 Island Press has built a deep body of knowledge with more than 1 000 books in print and some. 30 new releases each year Our books tackle the crucial challenges of the twenty first century designing livable. resilient cities with opportunities for all ensuring abundant fresh water protecting the beauty and diversity of the. natural world limiting the scale and impact of climate change. And Island Press brings ideas to those who can turn them into action Through workshops webinars and. events we bring authors into conversation with business and civic leaders advocates and engaged citizens Our. work has measurable impact on thinking policy and practice building knowledge to inspire change. ABOUT THE KRESGE FOUNDATION,and its ENVIRONMENT PROGRAM. The Kresge Foundation is a 3 5 billion private national foundation that works to expand opportunities in. America s cities through grant making and investing in arts and culture education environment health human. services and community development in Detroit Its Environment Program helps communities build environ. mental economic and social resilience in the face of climate change. For Kresge resilience is more than just withstanding stresses it also includes the capacity to prosper under a. wide range of climate influenced circumstances In the long term resilience is possible only if society reduces green. house gas emissions and avoids the worst impacts of climate change So strengthening a community s resilience. requires efforts to, Reduce the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. Plan for the changes that already are under way or anticipated. Foster social cohesion and inclusion, As a foundation committed to creating opportunity for low income people and communities Kresge is particu. larly concerned with the effect climate change has on people with limited economic resources It works to engage peo. ple from historically underrepresented groups in efforts to build resilient communities and plan for climate change. Bounce Forward Urban Resilience in the Era of Climate Change is one effort toward advancing those aims. URBAN RESILIENCE PROJECT,ADVISORY COMMITTEE,SCOTT BERNSTEIN ANN KINZIG.
President Cofounder Professor School of Life Sciences. Center for Neighborhood Technology University of Arizona Resilience Alliance. Chief Research Strategist, LAUREL BLATCHFORD Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute. Senior Vice President Solutions of Sustainability,Enterprise Community Partners. MANUEL PASTOR, SUSAN CUTTER Professor of Sociology and American Studies. Professor of Geography and Director and Ethnicity, Hazards Research Lab Director of The Program for Environmental. University of South Carolina and Regional Equity,University of Southern California.
DENISE FAIRCHILD,President CEO JOHN POWELL, Emerald Cities Collaborative Professor of Law and African American. Studies Ethnic Studies,GARRETT FITZGERALD,Robert D Haas Chancellor s Chair in Equity. Strategic Partnerships Advisor,and Inclusion,Urban Sustainability Directors Network. University of California Berkeley,EMIL FRANKEL,WENDY SLUSSER. Visiting Scholar and Director,Clinical Professor of Pediatrics.
of Transportation Policy,University of California Los Angeles. Bipartisan Policy Center,BEN STRAUSS,RICHARD J JACKSON. Vice President for Sea Level,Professor former Chair of Environmental. and Climate Impacts,Health Sciences,Climate Central. University of California, Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health BOB YARO.
Senior Advisor and President Emeritus,Regional Plan Association. People enjoying the revitalized Campus Martius park in Detroit MI Photo courtesy of iStockphoto com. Foreword v,Executive summary vii,The context 1,The project 9. Resilience defined 11,Urban resilience A draft integrated framework 19. Resilience in practice 25,Opportunities for action 29. Conclusion 32,Appendix 33,Endnotes 34, The High Line is a popular park built on a repurposed railroad spur in Manhattan Photo courtesy of.
iStockphoto com, The need for resilience could spark transformative. changes in American cities, As a foundation committed to creating opportunity for low income people in American cities The. Kresge Foundation is keenly aware of the severity and pervasive nature of climate change as well as its. disproportionate impact on vulnerable people and communities. While climate change is a global problem its effects are and increasingly will be felt locally in. communities across the United States and around the globe Just as federal and state level action on. climate change is required cities also play a critical role in mitigating climate change and helping soci. ety prepare for those impacts that it is too late to prevent. Given this important role of cities the Kresge Environment Program has focused its efforts to help. communities build their resilience in the face of climate change. To build climate resilience communities must simultaneously. L essen overall demand for energy and increase the proportion derived from renewable energy. Anticipate and prepare for pressures and shocks that climate change will introduce or worsen and. Strengthen connections among individuals and networks while advancing social inclusion to. foster social cohesion, It is a tall order and urban decision makers have only begun to wrestle with the challenges. As effectively described in this framing paper building climate resilience requires that urban leaders. rethink the systems that supply their cities energy transportation food water and housing It requires. practitioners to work across disciplines and sectors something that has been historically difficult to. achieve It also should require us to make transparent the value judgments that are reflected in resilience. strategy choices that is what is being made resilient and for whose benefit. Kresge has partnered with Island Press on this Urban Resilience Project for several reasons We share. the view that a holistic transformative approach to urban climate resilience requires new frameworks for. analyzing challenges and devising responses Both organizations see a need to bring new voices into the. conversation particularly those of experts and advocates who approach climate resilience work with a. strong grounding in the experiences and interests of low income communities We want to accelerate the. pace with which practical actionable information reaches urban leaders and those who will assist them in. their climate resilience efforts, We look forward to continued work with our partners at Island Press and others in the nonprofit. sector who are working to build a strong diverse field of practice to advance climate resilience As this. framing paper advocates the need for resilience could spark transformative changes in American cities. We hope that will be the case,Rip Rapson Lois R DeBacker.
President and CEO Managing Director Environment Program. The Kresge Foundation The Kresge Foundation, Job trainees get hands on experience installing a solar electric system for a low income. homeowner in Richmond CA Photo Solar Richmond and Green for All. We define urban resilience as the capacity, of a community to anticipate plan for and mitigate. the risks and seize the opportunities associated,with environmental and social change. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY, In an era rocked by climate change and other large scale disruptions our cities must be resilient. in order to survive and thrive But what does that mean exactly What is known about urban resilience. and what remains to be explored And how can we put thinking into practice to create the resilient. cities of the future, To help answer those questions Island Press launched the Urban Resilience Project in 2013 with.
support from The Kresge Foundation We began with a survey of the existing literature on resilience. and reached out to a diverse group of organizers researchers planners and other urban change agents. In a series of interviews and an all day assembly we listened deeply to what they had to say This report. endeavors to capture what we learned,A FEW KEY POINTS. Resilience is about coping with change We live in an era of unprecedented environmental and social. change Some changes like the rising seas and powerful storms of a changing climate are unambig. uously negative Others including the emergence of new technologies can be positive or negative. depending on one s situation and perspective Urban resilience in this context can be defined as the. capacity of a community to anticipate plan for and mitigate the risks and seize the opportunities. associated with environmental and social change, In a world of rising inequality risks and opportunities are not equally shared In an increasing. ly unequal world the affluent are well positioned to seize the opportunities that come with change and. shield themselves from harm while the disadvantaged and marginalized face disproportionate risks. These dynamics are self perpetuating the affluent consolidate their gains while the poor fall farther. behind Equity then is central to resilience, Cities are key Because a majority of the world s people now live in urban areas cities are an. important focus of efforts to build resilience Cities can concentrate risk but they can also incubate. solutions The stakes are high urban infrastructure resource use and social systems will have profound. consequences for our planet and its people in the centuries to come. Urban resilience is multidimensional The capacity of cities to cope with change is shaped by a. broad array of factors including social systems the health and integrity of ecosystems and the nature. of the built environment As a result urban resilience spans disciplines and sectors from sociology to. ecology from public health to landscape architecture. Current understanding of resilience remains siloed There is a growing body of knowledge about. resilience within the natural and social sciences and in the field of disaster risk reduction Yet while. each of these perspectives is necessary to address the challenges our cities face none is sufficient on its. own There is a great need for interdisciplinary cross sectoral systems thinking and action on urban. resilience, Resilience is an idea with potentially transformative power The need for resilience could spark. transformative changes in American cities True resilience calls on us to rethink the urban systems that. supply our energy transportation food water and housing It calls on us to live within planetary limits. to avoid further destabilizing natural systems And it calls on us to eradicate the inequities that magnify. vulnerability to disaster and to distribute opportunities more fairly so that all people have a chance to. adapt and thrive in a fast changing world, Many have embraced the resilience framework Recent years have seen an explosion of interest.
in resilience both in academia and in public policy And many of those consulted for this project have. embraced resilience as a framework for thinking and practice and or as a means of garnering new. support for their work Some believe a resilience framework could help build mainstream support for. paradigm shifting changes like distributed renewable energy and social policies that promote greater. equity and inclusion, But the transformative potential of resilience is far from assured There are several potential. pitfalls Notably if resilience is conceived simply as bouncing back from disaster it could prove. harmful by reinforcing systems that compound the risks our cities face More insidiously the concept. of resilience could be co opted by opponents of meaningful reform And if efforts to build resilience do. not also mitigate climate change they will be of limited use. The Urban Resilience Project can help seize the opportunities and avoid the pitfalls that. accompany the new attention to resilience To that end we will advance a holistic transformative. approach to thinking and practice on urban resilience which is grounded in a commitment to sustain. ability and equity, We can and must take action Turbulent times present us with extraordinary opportunities to. make our cities more sustainable equitable and resilient In the pages that follow you will find a pro. visional framework for thinking about that challenge And importantly you will find a call to action. The Island Press Urban Resilience Project and its partners are working to advance transformative. approaches to resilience that are grounded in sustainability and equity To that end we will spark inquiry. across disciplines and sectors and leverage short and long form content to shape thinking and practice. We will lift up new voices that can speak from and to a broad range of communities We will help imagine. and inspire the cities of the future and provide practical actionable information to create them We invite. BOUNCE FORWARD A Strategy Paper from Island Press and The And we share ideas through multiple Resilience is an idea with potentially transformative power

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